History Curriculum

Illustration of historic items

History Aims

Churchfields Junior School’s History Aims are derived from the aims of the National Curriculum for History and every history lesson taught at the school is mapped onto one of these key aims, to ensure that every aspect of this fascinating subject is given appropriate attention through every pupils’ journey through history from the beginning of year 3 to the end of year 6.

History Questions

Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments.

History Chronological Narratives

Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories.

History Concepts

Use abstract historical terms and concepts.

History Connections

Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends.

History Organise

Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge.

Substantive Knowledge

Historical enquiry at Churchfields Junior School is underpinned by strong substantive knowledge of chronology, events and individuals. This knowledge is cultivated using high-quality information texts containing a range of sources for pupils to explore during direct instruction, discussion and quizzing, and guided and independent practise.

 

Substantive knowledge is practised and reinforced through weekly (lesson starter quiz), termly (Test Your Skills) and yearly review (revision) and study of a variety of civilisations in chronological order builds pupils’ sense of timelines which overlap, intersect and run concurrently.​

 

As they move through the school, pupils also build increasingly sophisticated schema around explicitly taught Historical Concepts such as civilisation and monarchy, with definitions adapted to provide greater challenge and deeper understanding in each subsequent year group.

Disciplinary Knowledge

Pupils’ knowledge of how historians undertake historical enquiries is developed through History Skills embedded in lesson learning objectives and independent practise tasks, which challenge children to utilise their substantive knowledge to make comparisons and historical judgements about continuity and change, cause and consequence and similarity and difference.

History Skills

history cause consequence

Cause and Consequence

history continuity change

Continuity and Change

history historical interpretation

Historical Interpretation

history historical significance

Historical Significance

history similarity difference

Similarity and Difference

history sources evidence

Sources and Evidence

Year 3

Week 1

Outcome

  • To place the Stone, Bronze and Iron ages in Britain on a timeline

 

Vocabulary

  • past, present, timeline, chronological, period

 

Revision

  • Introduce concepts of A.D./C.E. and B.C./B.C.E.

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Invasion: people arriving in Britain in the Stone to Iron Ages were not invaders

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 2

Outcome

  • To explain what prehistory is and how we know about it

 

Vocabulary

  • prehistory, source, evidence, archaeology, archaeologist

 

Revision

  • Recap concepts of A.D./C.E. and B.C./B.C.E.

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Stone, Bronze and Iron age groups of people in Britain were not civilisations

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources & evidence

Week 3

Outcome

  • To discuss the sources that provide information about the Stone Age

 

Vocabulary

  • primary, secondary, source, evidence, artefact

 

Revision

  • To identify primary and secondary sources

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Groups of people leave evidence behind them

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources & evidence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To explain what a hunter-gatherer is

 

Vocabulary

  • Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, tribe, nomadic, shelter

 

Revision

  • To recall when the Palaeolithic period was

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Monarchy: Tribes did not have one clear leader

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources & evidence

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe how Cheddar man might have lived

 

Vocabulary

  • Mesolithic, diet, cave, settle

 

Revision

  • To recall when the Mesolithic period was

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Peasantry: Introduce definition – Cheddar man couldn’t have been a peasant

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 6

Outcome

  • To illustrate the significance of Skara Brae

 

Vocabulary

  • settlement, Neolithic, hearth, preserved, whalebone, expose

 

Revision

  • To recall when the Neolithic period was

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Elements of civilized society began to develop in the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 7

Outcome

  • To describe how life changed when humans began to farm

 

Vocabulary

  • climate change, agriculture, fertile, Neolithic

 

Revision

  • Recall what is meant by the term ‘hunter-gatherer’

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Natural events impact human development

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 1

Outcome

  • To assess the significance of Stonehenge

 

Vocabulary

  • monument, religion, burial, calendar, healing

 

Revision

  • To recognise the Cenotaph as a monument and recall its purpose. WW1 revision (KS1) & link to Remembrance.

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Organised groups generate great achievements

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To write a History essay: Were Stone Age humans ‘simply’ hunter gatherers?

Focus on changes from Palaeolithic to Neolithic period, showing why it is not ‘simple’, nor that the people were ‘simple’

 

Vocabulary

  • cave, art, Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, tribe, nomadic, shelter

 

Revision

  • To explain what a hunter-gatherer is

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To write a History essay: Were Stone Age humans ‘simply’ hunter gatherers?

Focus on changes from Palaeolithic to Neolithic period, showing why it is not ‘simple’, nor that the people were ‘simple’

 

Vocabulary

  • cave, art, Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, tribe, nomadic, shelter

 

Revision

  • To locate the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic periods on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • To write a History essay: Were Stone Age humans ‘simply’ hunter gatherers?

Focus on changes from Palaeolithic to Neolithic period, showing why it is not ‘simple’, nor that the people were ‘simple’

 

Vocabulary

  • cave, art, Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, tribe, nomadic, shelter

 

Revision

  • To discuss the sources that provide information about the Stone Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 5

Outcome

  • Test assess knowledge and understanding of the Stone Age

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions

Week 6

Outcome

  • To recognise why bronze replaced stone and the changes it brought to society

 

Vocabulary

  • alloy, durable, sharper, plough, weapons, utensils, jewellery

 

Revision

  • To place the Bronze Age in Britain on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Farming allowed permanent settlements to develop

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 7

Outcome

  • To justify whether there were ‘Beaker People’ or only  ‘Beaker Culture’

 

Vocabulary

  • invention, migration, mine, casting, culture

 

Revision

  • To describe the difference between a primary source and a secondary source

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Invasion: Beaker culture may have been gradually adopted by people already living in Britain, rather than Britain filling with ‘Beaker people’ (though there was migration too)

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 1

Outcome

  • To investigate why the smelting of iron was an important development

 

Vocabulary

  • agriculture, invention, smelting, sickle, plough

 

Revision

  • KS1 – To know WW1 technology using metals e.g. barbed wire, shells, bullets, tanks

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation: Stone, Bronze and Iron age people in Britain exploited the landscape for resources

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Civilisation: Stone, Bronze and Iron age people in Britain exploited the landscape for resources

Week 2

Outcome

  • To compare interpretations of why hill forts were built

 

Vocabulary

  • goods, surplus, barter, exchange, production, raw materials

 

Revision

  • To recall the possible purposes of Stonehenge

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Parliament: Trade began to connect distant lands with each other

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To establish change and continuity in homes from the Palaeolithic to Iron Age

 

Vocabulary

  • hearth, wattle, daub, thatch, clan

 

Revision

  • KS1 – 1666 Great Fire of London, started in Pudding Lane, spread in densely housed area, wood and thatch materials, diarised by Samuel Pepys

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Peasantry: Larger settlements led to richer and poorer people

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 4

Outcome

  • To explain who the Celts were

 

Vocabulary

  • tribes, culture, society, religion, reliable

 

Revision

  • To recall when humans first arrived in Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Empire: Though Celts inhabited many lands, they consisted of many distinct tribes

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 5

Outcome

  • To evaluate the strength and wealth of Britain when Roman invasions began

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To recall the different objects made by Beaker people

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Invasion: The Roman Empire used its power and wealth to conquer much of the British Isles, ending the Iron Age (though iron continued to be the important material)

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of the Bronze and Iron Ages

 

Revision

  • To review misconceptions from the assessment

Week 1

Outcome

  • To locate the Old, Midde and New kingdoms of ancient Egypt on a timeline alongside history in Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • pharoah, age, period, era, B.C.E.

 

Revision

  • To locate the Stone, Iron and Bronze Ages on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To explain the significance of the River Nile

 

Vocabulary

  • travel, trade, fertile, irrigated, crops, papyrus, agriculture

 

Revision

  • To list the things that changed in Britain when humans learned to farm

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To explain the significance of Gods and Godesses in ancient Egypt

 

Vocabulary

  • Ra, Anubis, Horus, culture, beliefs

 

Revision

  • To describe what the Celts believed

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 4

Outcome

  • To recall the key features of temples

 

Vocabulary

  • obelisk, pylon, ritual, sanctuary, hypostyle hall

 

Revision

  • To list the features of Stonehenge

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe the role of the Pharaoh and examine some key Pharaohs in chronological order

 

Vocabulary

  • pharaoh, peasant, trade, barter, farmers, craftsmen

 

Revision

  • KS1 Queen Elizabeth 1 became Queen 1558, daughter of Henry VIII, defeated Spanish Armada (invasion) 1588, left no heir

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 1

Outcome

  • To compare daily life for the Pharaoh with daily life for most ancient Egyptians

 

Vocabulary

  • To compare daily life for the Pharaoh with daily life for most ancient Egyptians

 

Revision

  • KS1 – To know Mahatma Gandhi 1869–1948; fought for rights of Indians in South Africa; returned to India to campaign for Indian independence from Britain; nonviolent protest

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 2

Outcome

  • To investigate life for women and children in ancient Egypt

 

Vocabulary

  • gender, roles, household, family, business

 

Revision

  • KS1 – To know Emmeline Pankhurst, mother of Sylvia Pankhurst (Woodford resident); suffragette  movement for women’s rights in Britain; 1918 first voting rights for women in UK; 1928 equal voting rights

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To know the differences between growing up rich and poor in Ancient Egypt

 

Vocabulary

  • similar, different, evidence, discover, diversity

 

Revision

  • Y3 – To recall how Cheddar man might have lived

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 4

Outcome

  • To explain why the ancient Egyptians practiced mummification

 

Vocabulary

  • sarcophagus, afterlife, religion, glacier

 

Revision

  • Y3 – to know the significance of Skara Brae

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 5

Outcome

  • To discuss how and why the pyramids were built

 

Vocabulary

  • preserve, afterlife, mummified, interpretation, myth

 

Revision

  • Y3 – possible purposes of hill forts

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 6

Outcome

  • To examine the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb

 

Vocabulary

  • discovery, tomb, monument, significance, catalogue

 

Revision

  • Y3 – To explain the importance of Stonehenge

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 1

Outcome

  • To interpret hieroglyphics and recognize the significance of the Rosetta Stone

 

Vocabulary

  • hieroglyphs, ankh, translation, ancient, stylus, oracle, language

 

Revision

  • To explain what prehistory is and how we know about it

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To interpret hieroglyphics and recognize the significance of the Rosetta Stone

 

Vocabulary

  • hieroglyphs, ankh, translation, ancient, stylus, oracle, language

 

Revision

  • To explain what prehistory is and how we know about it

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To discuss whether Egyptian artefacts in the British Museum should go back to Egypt

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To recall arguments about ‘beaker people’ vs. ‘beaker culture

 

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To examine how inventive were the Ancient Egyptians

 

Vocabulary

  • scrolls, inventions, shaduf

 

Revision

  • To recall why the smelting of iron was a significant development

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 5

Outcome

  • To know how the Ancient Egyptian civilisation ended

 

Vocabulary

  • Cleopatra, defeated, Roman Empire, Mark Antony, civilisation

 

Revision

  • To evaluate the strength and wealth of Britain when Roman invasions began

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Ancient Egypt

 

Revision

  • To review misconceptions from assessment

Week 7

Outcome

  • To explain what people find so fascinating about ancient Egypt

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To sort a range of primary and secondary sources

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • Civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages

In order to ensure the development of a chronologically secure knowledge, Year 3 starts with an investigation into the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages.

 

A combination of overview and depth studies combines to help pupils understand both the long arc of development and the complexity of specific aspects of the content.

 

With this in mind, each topic in each year group is started with an overarching timeline that draws on their knowledge of when other topics happened (for Year 3 it draws upon their understanding of ‘time’ they worked on in KS1), as well as getting them to realise that history isn’t just one thing after another, but rather a much more complicated series of overlapping and connected narratives.

In depth studies within the topic were chosen from a consideration of what I thought were best suited to allowing children to naturally find and develop their own understanding of patterns. For example the Stone Age to the Iron Age learning objectives cover the themes of challenges of their time, history of the UK, ancient civilisations, technology, houses and home and impact on a modern society. Vocabulary it will utilize and cement includes: society, ruler, tribe, defeat, exploration, civilisation, community, source, archaeologist, navigation.

 

Year 3 also get a chance to explore the following themes through the lens of the Ancient Egyptians: inspire curiosity, world influences, empires, non-European civilisations, military, and technology, impact on modern society and so on.

Historical Concepts

history civilisation

Civilisation

Organised grouping of people who share enough ideas and ways of living to live together peacefully.

History Society

Society

People living together in an organised way, making decisions about how to do things, and sharing the work that needs to be done.

history invasion sword

Invasion

A group using violence to take control of the land or lives of another group.

history empire

Empire

Many people in separate or different places controlled by the government or ruler of only one of those places.

history monarchy

Monarchy

Having a King or Queen as the Head of State.

History Innovation

Innovation

Start using new things or new ways of doing things.

Textbooks

 

Stone Age, Iron Age and Bronze Age (September—February)

 

Ancient Egypt (March—July)

Year 4

Week 1

Outcome

  • To place Ancient Greece on a timeline and summarise its origins to the classical period

 

Vocabulary

  • Mediterranean, Mycenaeans, culture, achievements, discovery

 

Revision

  • To recap concepts of A.D./C.E. and B.C./B.C.E. and locate the Stone, Iron and Bronze ages on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To express the role of Gods in Ancient Greek culture

 

Vocabulary

  • religion, myth, oracle, legend, temple, Mount Olympus, civilisation, polytheism

 

Revision

  • To recall the names of the main Egyptian gods and goddesses

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To explain what a city state is and compare Athens with Sparta

 

Vocabulary

  • democracy, Polis, city-state, barracks, colonies, acropolis, agora, monarchies, Athens, oligarchy, rights, honour

 

Revision

  • To illustrate the significance of Skara Brae

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity & difference

Week 4

Outcome

  • To evaluate the beginning of democracy in Athens

 

Vocabulary

  • citizen, slave, government, direct, representative, participate, ekklesia, Pnyx, ostracism, Peloponnesian wars

 

Revision

  • To recall the diagram of the hierarchical ruling system of the Ancient Egyptians

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe what daily life was like for ancient Athenians

 

Vocabulary

  • citizen, slave, agora, diet, religion, gender, trade, theatre, symposium, myths, chiton, himation

 

Revision

  • To examine what life was like in Ancient Egypt, from the Pharaoh to the slaves

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources & evidence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To appraise what life was like for women in ancient Greece

 

Vocabulary

  • wealthy, peasant, chiton, chores, household, agora, restrictions

 

Revision

  • To recall key facts  about the life of women and children in Ancient Egypt

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources & evidence

Week 7

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Ancient Greece

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Week 1

Outcome

  • To compare the importance of the ancient and modern Olympic Games

 

Vocabulary

  • athlete, individual, olive, pentathlon, Olympia, inclusive

 

Revision

  • To compare Ancient with Modern Egypt

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 2

Outcome

  • To discuss whether Alexander deserved to be called ‘Great’

 

Vocabulary

  • conquer, empire, emperor, king, disintegrate, legacy, Hellenistic period

 

Revision

  • To examine the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To inspect the arts, literature and architecture in Ancient Greece

 

Vocabulary

  • To inspect the arts, literature and architecture in Ancient Greece

 

Revision

  • Were Stone Age humans ‘simply’ hunter gatherers?

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 4

Outcome

  • To define what philosophy meant in ancient Greece.

 

Vocabulary

  • philosophy, socratic method, science, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle

 

Revision

  • To examine how inventive were the Ancient Egyptians

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

 

Week 5

Outcome

  • To examine ancient Greek figures in maths and science

 

Vocabulary

  • Thales, Archimedes, Pythagoras, geometry, innovation, technology

 

Revision

  • To recap the discoveries of Magellan

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 6

Outcome

  • To examine Ancient Greek ideas on medicine

 

Vocabulary

  • Hippocrates, Asclepion, humours, symptom

 

Revision

  • To describe the process of mummification

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 7

Outcome

  • To demonstrate the impact of Ancient Greek scientific discoveries on the modern world

 

Vocabulary

  • philosophy, cartography, chronology, invention, scientific

 

Revision

  • To argue the impact of Ancient Egyptians on life today

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 1

Outcome

  • To compare Ancient Greek ideas with Ancient Egypt

 

Vocabulary

  • language, architecture, dictatorship, wealth, polytheism

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain what is the impact of Ancient Egypt on life today

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity & difference

Week 2

Outcome

  • Essay: How did the Ancient Greeks shape the modern world

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • Essay: How did the Ancient Greeks shape the modern world

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 4

Outcome

  • Essay: How did the Ancient Greeks shape the modern world
  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Ancient Greece 2

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To place the Romans on a timeline and discuss the founding of Rome

 

Vocabulary

  • legend, civilisation, Romulus, Remus, Tiber, Palatine

 

Revision

  • To locate the Stone to Iron Age on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 6

Outcome

  • To give an account of Rome’s early history, up to the invasion of Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • invasion, conquer, empire, Caesar, emperor, republic

 

Revision

  • To ocate ancient Greece, Egypt on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause & consequence

Week 1

Outcome

  • To describe what Celtic Britain was like before the Romans arrived

 

Vocabulary

  • tribal, barbarians, kingdom, bias, Gaul

 

Revision

  • To describe who the Celts were

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 2

Outcome

  • To evaluate Julius Caesar’s invasions of Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • conquer, legion, ally, hostage, plunder, wealth, trade

 

Revision

  • To recall the different objects made by Beaker people

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To judge how easy the conquest of Britain was

 

Vocabulary

  • rebellion, power, political, myth

 

Revision

  • To recall arguments about ‘beaker people’ vs. ‘beaker culture

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • To examine the significance of Boudicca

 

Vocabulary

  • revolt, Iceni, torture, Caractacus, subjugation, legend, Colchester

 

Revision

  • To demonstrate what Cheddar Man tells us about the Mesolithic period

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To evaluate economic continuity and change when the Romans invaded Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • continuity, change, impact, local, nation, developments

 

Revision

  • To compare the changes to living from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Continuity and change

Week 1

Outcome

  • To examine why the Romans built Hadrian’s wall

 

Vocabulary

  • legion, territory, security, fort, turret, border, Celts, Picts, barbarian, aqueducts, frontier, semaphore

 

Revision

  • To know why the pyramids were built

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 2

Outcome

  • To discern the features of a Roman town

 

Vocabulary

  • Basilica, amphitheatre, forum, temple, baths

 

Revision

  • To list possible reasons why hill forts were built in the Iron Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 3

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Roman Britain 1

 

Revision

  • To discuss misconceptions from the assessment

 

 

 

 

Week 4

Outcome

  • To compare Celt and Roman homes and living

 

Vocabulary

  • Domus, insula, villa, wattle & daub, roundhouse

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain key ways daily life changed from Stone to Iron Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 5

Outcome

  • To assess continuity and change in Roman and Celtic religion in Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • religion, culture, Christianity, missionary, prophecies, worship, development, Mithras

 

Revision

  • To recap what the Celts believed

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 6

Outcome

  • To recognise what life was like for women in Roman Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • continuity, change, impact, local, nation, developments

 

Revision

  • To compare the changes to living from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 1

Outcome

  • To examine technology introduced to Britain by the Romans

 

Vocabulary

  • hypocaust, aqueduct, transport, sanitation, survey

 

Revision

  • hypocaust, aqueduct, transport, sanitation, survey

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

 

Week 2

Outcome

  • To analyse the causes of the end of Roman Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • currency, technology, Christianity, culture, urban, united, tribal, religion

 

Revision

  • To judge why Ancient Egypt ended

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 3

Outcome

  • To question how we know about the Romans in Britain and compare Bede and Tacitus

 

Vocabulary

  • town, countryside, society, theatre, trade, marble, forum, aqueducts, basilica, villas, estates

 

Revision

  • To discuss the sources that provide information about the Stone Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 4

Outcome

  • To demonstrate the legacy of Roman Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • legacy, language, technology, society, advancements, medicine, technology

 

Revision

  • To recall key ancient Greek scientific discoveries

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 5

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Roman Britain 2

 

History revision

  • To discuss misconceptions

Week 6

Outcome

  • To examine Ancient Roman ideas on medicine

 

Vocabulary

  • celsius, Cupping, Galen, humours, surgical, scalpel, aqueduct, dissection, influence, hygiene

 

Revision

  • To discuss the earliest medicines

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Outcome

  • To discuss whether the Romans shaped Britain more than the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages

 

Vocabulary

  • AD, BC, agriculture, archaeology, century, invention, democracy, myths, interpretation, metal working, culture, society, politics, missionary, history, prehistory

 

Revision

  • To discuss the major developments in the Bronze Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 7

Outcome

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To discuss the major developments in the Iron Age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Ancient Greece and Ancient Romans

Continuing chronologically, Year 4 looks at the Ancient Greek followed by the Ancient Romans. As with all topics in each year group, the topic begins with revisiting a timeline that refreshes their knowledge and gives them an accurate idea of when these events and ideas took place.

 

Ancient Greece is a big topic for considering an ‘impact on the modern world’, with a closer look at the beginning of democracy, key figures such as Pythagoras Aristotle, as well other ancient Greek inventions (and the Olympic games).

 

Children also look at what life was like for children and women, as well as other broader ideas like religion, trade, military, politics and architecture.

Historical Concepts

history civilisation

Civilisation

A state of human society that is very developed and organised where people act in a civilised manner.

History Society

Society

People living together in a community who benefit from each other’s skills and work.

history invasion sword

Invasion

An instance of one group violently forcing itself into the country or region of others.

history empire

Empire

A large territory or group of territories under the control of one government or ruler.

history monarchy

Monarchy

A form of government in which the monarch is the head of state for life.

History Innovation

Innovation

An idea or way of doing things that is newly introduced.

Textbooks

Ancient Greece (September—February)

Roman Britain (March—July)

Year 5

Week 1

Outcome

  • To create a national and international timeline of the stone age to the Roman Empire

 

Vocabulary

  • chronology, era, AD, BC, CE, BCE, Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Celt, ancient

 

Revision

  • To place the Stone, Bronze and Iron ages in Britain on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To analyse why the Anglo-Saxons came to Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • migration, collapse , factors, emperor, Invaders, Vortigern, legend

 

Revision

  • To explain why the Romans invaded Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause & consequence

Week 3

Outcome

  • To compare the reasons behind the Anglo-Saxon invasion with the Roman invasion

 

Vocabulary

  • migration, collapse , factors, emperor, Invaders, Vortigern, legend

 

Revision

  • To explain why the Romans invaded Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause & consequence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To explain how the Anglo-Saxons ruled in England

 

Vocabulary

  • Bretwalda, Thegns, Fyrd, Weregild, succession, evidence, raiders, monasteries

 

Revision

  • To create a diagram of the hierarchical ruling system of the Ancient Egyptians

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Continuity and change

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe daily life for a typical Anglo-Saxon family

 

Vocabulary

  • intricate, remedies, wattle and daub, plough, thatch, social hierarchy,judgement, prosperity, mead

 

Revision

  • To compare life in a Roman town to Roman countryside

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Continuity and change

Week 6

Outcome

  • To discuss the life of a woman in Anglo-Saxon times

 

Vocabulary

  • equality, sources, education, weaving, supervise, uniformity, comparison, Hilda of Whitby

 

Revision

  • To recognise what life was like for women in Roman Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • peasantry

Week 1

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Anglo-Saxons 1

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Week 2

Outcome

  • To assess the influence of religion in Anglo-Saxon culture

 

Vocabulary

  • pagans, despised, Christianity, woden, ancestors, biased, tradition, illumination

 

Revision

  • To express the role of myths in Ancient Greek culture

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To examine the rise of Christianity in Anglo-Saxon Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • papacy, missionaries, biased, monasteries, vellum, Celtic, Catholic conversion, Lindisfarne, Augustine

 

Revision

  • To know the role of religion in Roman culture

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • To compare popular depictions of King Arthur with historical evidence

 

Vocabulary

  • discovery, evidence, hoard, archaeologists, legend, kingdoms, Bretwalda, Bede, importance, conversion

 

Revision

  • To know when and sequence of events of Boudicca’s rebellion

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 5

Outcome

  • To analyse evidence and historians’ views of the Sutton Hoo burial

 

Vocabulary

  • discovery, evidence, hoard, archaeologists, legend, kingdoms, Bretwalda, Bede, importance, conversion

 

Revision

  • To examine the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To examine the life of King Alfred the Great

 

Vocabulary

  • kingdom, territory, Witan, treachery, burghs, Scandinavia, United Great Heathen Army, chronicle

 

Revision

  • What was the role of the Pharaoh?

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 7

Outcome

  • To discuss whether Alfred really was Great

 

Vocabulary

  • pious, centralised, Wessex, humility, Eddington, legal, Danelaw, education

 

Revision

  • To discuss whether Alexander deserved to be called ‘Great’

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 1

Outcome

  • To illustrate how England became one kingdom

 

Vocabulary

  • anointed, Bretwalda, Danelaw, kingdom, merciful, threatened, Athelstan

 

Revision

  • To explain the key ways the Romans changed Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 2

Outcome

  • To assess the decline of Anglo-Saxon power

 

Vocabulary

  • Bretwalda, massacre, raid, Danelaw, Dangeld, rule

 

Revision

  • To know the reasons the Romans left Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 3

Outcome

  • Case study: Anglo-Saxon chronicle

 

Vocabulary

  • reliability, propaganda, Christian, pagan, Bede, runes, monastery, exaggerate, manuscript

 

Revision

  • To know who was not affected by Roman rule

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise argument

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To demonstrate the importance of the monasteries in Anglo-Saxon Britain

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To demonstrate the importance of the monasteries in Anglo-Saxon Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 5

Outcome

  • To discuss how the historical view of the Anglo-Saxon period has changed

 

Vocabulary

  • Dark Ages, obscurity, Isolationism, insecurity, Craftsmanship, written records, antiquities, archaeology, saga, Ecclesiastical, interpretation, arguments

 

Revision

  • To know examples of sources that tell us about the stone age

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of the Anglo-Saxons 2

 

Historical revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Week 1

Outcome

  • To place the Islamic Golden Age on a timeline alongside British history and sequence the main events of the Prophet’s life

 

Vocabulary

  • chronology, revelation, civilisation, Mecca, Muhammad, Arabic Peninsula, Hajj, Hadith

 

Revision

  • To place classical ancient Greece on a timeline

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To examine the spread of the Islamic Empire

 

Vocabulary

  • caliphate, Rashidun, Ummayad, Abbasid, invasion, conquest, dynasty, succession, hostility, provinces, Dinar, Sultan

 

Revision

  • To recall facts about Alexander’s empire

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To discuss the origins of Baghdad

 

Vocabulary

  • astrologers, Tigris, construction, squalid, scholars, Euphrates. Trade, allies, symbolise, suburbs

 

Revision

  • To recall what a city-state is

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • To compare ancient Baghdad to classical ancient Athens

 

Vocabulary

  • squalid, magnificent, markets, primitive, civilised, House of Wisdom, ceramics, fortifications

 

Revision

  • To describe what daily life was like for Ancient Athenians

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 5

Outcome

  • To evaluate the impact of irrigation on trade and daily life in Baghdad

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To know the importance of the Nile in Ancient Egypt

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Change and continuity

Week 1

Outcome

  • To compare everyday life for men and women, girls and boys, rich and poor in ancient Baghdad

 

Vocabulary

  • Maktab, Madrasa, spinning, weaving, comparison, judgements, embroidery, education, scholars, Madrasa

 

Revision

  • To understand the role of women in ancient Egypt

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 2

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of Golden Age of Islam 1

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Week 3

Outcome

  • To justify the importance of learning in Islamic civilisation

 

Vocabulary

  • arabesque, calligraphy, ceramics, manuscripts, tessellation, geometric

 

Revision

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • To summarise the discoveries of Islamic astronomers

 

Vocabulary

  • literary, astrology, ingenious, observatory, algebra, Al-Khwarizmi, numerical, House of Wisdom, inventions, scholars

 

Revision

  • To select the most significant Greek figures relating to modern maths, science and philosophy

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To argue that the Islamic Empire was the world’s first welfare state

 

Vocabulary

  • welfare state, comparisons, justifications, tolerance, Diwans, Al-Zahrawi, circumference, Ibn al-Haytham, Al-Jazari

 

Revision

  • To evaluate the beginning of democracy in Athens

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 6

Outcome

  • To discuss the developments in medicine in the Arab world

 

Vocabulary

  • maimonides, diagnoses, descriptions, dispensing, Rhazes, smallpox,experimenter, sources, symptoms

 

Revision

  • To recap Roman developments in medicine

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Continuity and change

Week 1

Outcome

  • To explain technological developments in the Golden Age of Islam

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Continuity and change

Week 2

Outcome

  • To analyse the significance of Cordoba

 

Vocabulary

  • Umayad, Al-Hakan, Abbasids, overthrown, Al-Andalus, Al-Walid,Abd-Al Rahman, Reconquista

 

Revision

  • To argue why the pyramids were built

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 3

Outcome

  • To explain how the Islamic Empire influenced Europe

 

Vocabulary

  • pilgrimage, enlightening, migration, civilisation, Gerbert of Aurillac, translations, tolerance, acceptance, crusades, looting

 

Revision

  • To argue the impact of Ancient Egyptians on life today

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 4

Outcome

  • Essay: ‘The legacy of the Golden Age of Islam is still felt today.’ To what extent do you agree?

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 5

Outcome

  • Essay: What was the legacy of the Golden Age of Islam?

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To argue the impact of Ancient Egyptians on life today

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 6

Outcome

  • Essay: What was the legacy of the Golden Age of Islam?

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To argue the impact of Ancient Egyptians on life today

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 7

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of the Golden Age of Islam 2

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Anglo-Saxons

Year 5 starts where the Romans left off with Anglo-Saxons, where children are initially encouraged to consider more ‘why’ questions and other examples such as what continued and what stayed the same. Life of a woman and law and order are also looked at to allow children to draw more comparisons across topics with what they have previously studied.

 

Religion and culture are heavily addressed in this topic, as well as more in depth and involved usage of key historical ideas like ‘archaeology’, Leading them to draw conclusions and use relevant historical information when assessing trade in Anglo-Saxon time as well as other factors like religious belief. Similarly to Year 4, the greatness of a figure such as Alfred is pulled into question, as well as more detailed evaluations of key sources of history such as the Anglo-Saxon chronicle.

The topic ends with an essay that pulls together their knowledge and skills into a piece that highlights their understanding (‘Is it fair to call it the dark ages?’). During this essay writing, children look back on the essay they did in year 3 (express whether humans were ‘simple hunter gatherers). This use of past lessons as revision at the beginning of each lesson has been carefully constructed to allow them to make connections themselves more organically.

Historical Concepts

history civilisation

Civilisation

A society under governance by a state that has a developed culture, language, writing system and currency.

History Society

Society

An organised grouping of individuals in which there is some degree of co-operation, communication, and division of labour.

history invasion sword

Invasion

The incoming or spread of something usually harmful, especially an incursion of an armed force for conquest or plunder.

history empire

Empire

An extensive territory or territories under single political domination or control.

history monarchy

Monarchy

A form of government in which supreme power is held by one person for life, usually passed on hereditarily.

History Innovation

Innovation

The creation and use of new ideas, technologies or methods.

Textbooks

Anglo-Saxons (September—February)

The Golden Age of Baghdad (March—July)

Year 6

Week 1

Outcome

  • To place WW2 on a UK timeline from the Stone Age to the present

 

Vocabulary

  • chronology, century, AD / CE, BC / BCE, war

 

Revision

  • To recall dates, locations and key facts of WW1

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To judge whether Britain had to go to War in 1939

 

Vocabulary

  • appeasement, empire, legacy, causation, Prime Minister, impact

 

Revision

  • To explain why the Romans invaded Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 3

Outcome

  • To discuss whether it was necessary for children to be evacuated from South Woodford

 

Vocabulary

  • evacuee, source, local, blitz, raid, propaganda

 

Revision

  • To investigate  life for women and children in Ancient Egypt

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To compare life for evacuated and non-evacuated children in Britain during WW2

 

Vocabulary

  • propaganda, change, museum, primary evidence, secondary evidence, continuity

 

Revision

  • To recall what the life of a child in ‘Golden Age’ Baghdad was like.

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity and difference

Week 5

Outcome

  • To understand how rationing worked in Britain in WW2

 

Vocabulary

  • rationed, supplies, supply routes, overseas, hoarding, Dig for Victory, ration book, Land Army

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain the Anglo Saxon diet

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To debate whether Dunkirk was a ‘miracle’

 

Vocabulary

  • evacuation, civilian, miracle, sacrifice, propaganda, significance

 

Revision

  • To know King Arthur may have been a British warlord who fought the Anglo Saxons

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 7

Outcome

  • Documentary Challenge: Visit to Imperial War Museum

Week 1

Outcome

  • To assess how the Battle of Britain led to the Blitz

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To know the hierarchy suggested by the weregild system

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 2

Outcome

  • To judge the impact of the Second World War on the role of women in Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • civilian, equality, conscription, military, society, role, propaganda, position, change, contribution

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain rights of Anglo Saxon women

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • civilisation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To examine the role of propaganda up to and during the war

 

Vocabulary

  • interpretation, bias, propaganda, cartoon, anti-Semitism, poster, political, perspective

 

Revision

  • To know monasteries were centres of learning

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 4

Outcome

  • Case study of local historical figure (Winston Churchill)

 

Vocabulary

  • Churchill, Hitler, Chamberlain, surrender, invasion, government, Dunkirk, resistance, orator, charisma, ideological, resolute, leadership, legacy, warmonger

 

Revision

  • To recall the reasons to call King Alfred ‘Great’

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • parliament

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 5

Outcome

  • To understand the importance of D-Day as a turning point and a step towards ending WW2

 

Vocabulary

  • D-Day, liberation, Normandy landings, Operation Overlord, retreat, resistance

 

Revision

  • To know the first significant Viking raid: Lindisfarne 793CE

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • To know the first significant Viking raid: Lindisfarne 793CE

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 6

Outcome

  • To know how the war ended and V-E Day celebrations

 

Vocabulary

  • V-E Day, victory, surrender, demob

 

Revision

  • To know what is the Anglo-Saxon chronicle

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 7

Outcome

  • To assess my knowledge and understanding of WW2 on the home front

 

Revision

  • To review misconceptions from the assessment

 

Week 1

Outcome

  • To create a timeline of key events in British history from the Roman withdrawal to the Battle of Hastings

 

Vocabulary

  • settlers, raid, continuity

 

Revision

  • To recall reasons the Romans left Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical significance

Week 2

Outcome

  • To establish who the Vikings were and evaluate why they started coming to Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • Scandinavia, Lindisfarne, Jarlshof, monastery, archaeology, colonise, colony, settlers, raid, church, historical source, Orkneyinga Saga

 

Revision

  • To recall reasons the Anglo-Saxons came to Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical Interpretation

Week 3

Outcome

  • To justify the arrival of the Great Heathen Army as a key turning point

 

Vocabulary

  • invasion, Christianity, Danelaw, conquer, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Ivar the Boneless, Erik Bloodaxe

 

Revision

  • To explain who might King Arthur really have been?

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Sources and evidence

Week 4

Outcome

  • To assess whether the Vikings had an empire

 

Vocabulary

  • North Sea, Europe, trade, longboat

 

Revision

  • To know about the Islamic Empire in the time of the Vikings

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Historical interpretation

Week 5

Outcome

  • To examine the role of powerful women in the struggle for the Kingdom of England

 

Vocabulary

  • Mercia, Aethelfled, Emma of Normandy, widow

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain the significance of Boudicca

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Similarity & difference

Week 6

Outcome

  • To evaluate whether ‘Unready’ is a fair description of Aethelred

 

Vocabulary

  • significance, impact, security, reign, advisor

 

Revision

  • To be able to explain what was ‘appeasement’ before WW2? Was it effective?

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

  • Cause and consequence

Week 1

Outcome

  • To explain the significance of the reign of Cnut

 

Vocabulary

  • conquest, invasion, emperor, massacre, reign, heir

 

Revision

  • To recall reasons Alexander might be considered ‘great’

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • empire

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 2

Outcome

  • To order the events leading to the Norman invasion of Britain

 

Vocabulary

  • impact, nation, legacy, invasion, conquest

 

Revision

  • To know Churchill’s local significance

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • monarchy

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 3

Outcome

  • To judge the significance of the last Viking invasion of England

 

Vocabulary

  • analyse, invasion, significance, conquest, causation

 

Revision

  • To know reasons for the end of the Islamic Empire

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 3. Use abstract historical terms and concepts

 

Historical substantive concept

  • invasion

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 4

Outcome

  • To evaluate Viking legacy and the portrayal of Vikings

 

Vocabulary

  • legacy, geography, political, impact, mythology

 

Revision

  • To know examples of the legacy of Roman Britain

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 5

Outcome

  • To assess my knowledge and understanding of the Vikings

 

Revision

  • To address misconceptions from the assessment

Week 1

Outcome

  • Essay: The Viking invasions were more important than the Saxon kings in the formation of England. To what extent do you agree?

Week 2

Outcome

  • Essay: The Viking invasions were more important than the Saxon kings in the formation of England. To what extent do you agree?

Week 3

Outcome

  • Essay: The Viking invasions were more important than the Saxon kings in the formation of England. To what extent do you agree?

Week 4

SATs Week

Week 5

Outcome

  • To draw a timeline of medical developments from Ancient Egypt to Ancient Rome

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To recall Mummification

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 2. Establish coherent and chronological narratives of UK and other civilisations’ histories

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 6

Outcome

  • To determine the causes and consequences of the plague

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To examine Ancient Greek ideas on medicine

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 1

Outcome

  • To examine the development of surgery

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To examine Ancient Roman ideas on medicine

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 2

Outcome

  • To argue how improvements in public health led to reductions in diseases

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To discuss the developments in medicine in the Arab world

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • peasantry

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 3

Rhos y Gwaliau

Week 4

Outcome

  • To evaluate the impact of the discovery of microbes on curing diseases

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To know about Mary Seacole

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 1. Ask historically valid questions, use sources, weigh evidence and appraise arguments

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe the contribution of women in medicine

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To know about Florence Nightingale

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 5. Organise historical information and apply historical knowledge

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 6

Outcome

  • To compare older and newer techniques for examining inside the body

 

Vocabulary

 

Revision

  • To know about Edith Cavell

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

  • 4. Explain historical connections, contrasts and trends

 

Historical substantive concept

  • civilisation

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

Week 7

Outcome

  • To assess knowledge and understanding of the history of medicine

 

Revision

  • To review misconceptions from the assessment

 

Historical aim from the National Curriculum

 

Historical substantive concept

 

Historical skill – disciplinary/second order concept

World War II

Year 6 starts with an investigation into WW2. Being a London Borough school with a special connection to Winston Churchill (being a Woodford and Wanstead MP), it is useful to capitalise on this perspective by making a significant focus of the topic about South Woodford and the wider London area’s response to the war. Having this close relationship allows children to become more fully invested in our study.

 

By looking at topics like evacuation and the blitz in the local area, pupils are encouraged to empathize with their counterparts during the war – producing more considered and thoughtful pieces.

 

In terms of the broader scope of the topic, we start (as with every history topic) a look at timelines to ensure that childrens’ chronological understanding is suitably firm before moving onto more complex issues around cause and consequence of keys events like WW1, the Treaty of Versailles, Great Depression etc. This exposes children to a broad range of vocabulary and ideas that they will have come across before but forces them to exercise them in completely different circumstances. For example, a consideration of how the idea of an ‘empire’ changes or stays the same, as well as the similarities between reasons for war and its likely consequences, in addition to tier 2/3 words such as ‘treaty’.

 

Accumulation of knowledge is developed alongside ample opportunities to practise historical skills learnt throughout the school, for example evaluating whether the evacuation of Dunkirk was a miracle, to assessing the impact of Churchill on the outcome of the war as well as comparing the leadership styles of Hitler and Churchill.

Vikings

The second part of the year 6 is a study of the Vikings – more specifically their role in the struggle for the Kingdom of England in the last few centuries of the first millennium, culminating in the last Viking invasion of 1066.

 

The topic begins again with a recap of timelines and chronology, with the pupils being asked to consider global, European and national differences, before a recap in basic Anglo Saxon knowledge.

 

We revisit ideas like archaeology and again get pupils to practise their historical skills of comparison and reasoning by considering ideas like why the Vikings invaded, as well as why they are portrayed in a certain way, in addition to a revision of how to use historical sources correctly.

 

The topic follows a broadly chronological structure, analysing and appraising key events like the attack on Lindisfarne, the invasion of the ‘Great Heathen Army’ and the creation of the Danelaw. This is especially useful as a this point in the topic, pupils naturally make comparisons between key historical figures in British history like Alfred the Great and Churchill, as well as Cnut and Ethelred the Unready. Furthermore, when looking at Ethelred and his policies for placating the Viking attacks, children are encourage to see the similarities between him and Neville Chamberlain and the effectiveness of appeasement.

 

Through out he topic, the learning objectives gradually become more and more considered and appraising, moving beyond the acquisition of knowledge to its active deployment. The topic ends with an evaluation of the impact the Vikings had on the formation of the ‘Kingdom of England’, which will draw upon the wealth of historical knowledge and skills the pupils have been building up since Year 3.

History of Medicine

In Year 6 we finish the year by looking at the history of medicine in Britain. This topic extends pupil’s chronological knowledge beyond 1066 in addition to providing Year 6 with a much more detailed backdrop to what is happening in the world around us. History is always a good subject to provide pupils with ‘cultural capital’ and this topic seeks to do just that.

 

Medicine, its history and the wide ranging impact this has had on our civilisation are key elements that equip the pupils with a keener understanding of what holds together and guides human development. This allows pupils to draw their own conclusions about the nature of our society, as well as giving pupils a more specific and detailed look at how ideas and practices come into being – an understanding that can be then be adapted to an infinite number of topics. Whilst this thematic approach to British history will be challenging, it has never been more appropriate.

 

We start by considering what is meant by ‘medicine’, before applying this chronologically – looking at the medieval period followed by the Victorian age. Familiar terms such as ‘cause’ and ‘consequence’ are used when evaluating the Black Death as well as reasoning behind why Victorians held certain beliefs about medicine.

 

As with the other Year 6 topics, an appraisal of key figures and their ‘impact’ forms a central part of our study, before comparing the importance of different discoveries and time periods. These learning objectives give pupils a further chance to put into practice their reasoning and analytical skills, before culminating in a pupil-led comparison of pandemics from the last 1000 years.

Historical Concepts

history civilisation

Civilisation

A stage of cultural development of a society at which writing and keeping of records is attained as well as a refinement of thought, manners or taste.

History Society

Society

An organised grouping of individuals involved in persistent social interaction with some degree of co-operation, communication, and division of labour.

history invasion sword

Invasion

An unwelcome intrusion into another’s domain, especially as an incursion by a number of people or things into a place or sphere of activity.

history empire

Empire

A major political unit having a territory of great extent or a number of territories or peoples under a single sovereign authority, particularly that of an emperor.

history monarchy

Monarchy

Undivided rule or absolute sovereignty over a state by a single person; usually a hereditary position with life tenure.

History Innovation

Innovation

The practical implementation of ideas that result in the introduction of a new process, method, product, service or solution.

Textbooks

WWII (September—January)

Viking Britain (January—May)

History of Medicine (May—July)