Design and Technology Curriculum

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.

Illustration of salad, muffin, pencil case, saw, needle and thread

To achieve these exceptional outcomes, design and technology is taught in half-termly blocks by a design and technology specialist, with lessons supported by the class teacher. The specialist demonstrates how the pupils should use tools and equipment safely and accurately, step by step, to ensure that the children are clear about the risks and expectations.

 

Independence is encouraged during lessons as a way to improve the pupil’s dexterity, precision and confidence with new techniques and materials.

Our pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Design and technology alternates with art each half-term. There is synchronicity between design and technology and the art and design curriculum in terms of William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement in Year 3. When Year 4 learn about structures in D&T they also learn about Zahar Hadid’s architecture and the importance of form. Technical drawings created when planning and designing products use proportion and perspective skills developed in art to create 3D renders in D&T. The software we use to code the Crumbles in Year 5 and 6, has been designed to mimic the software used in computing (Scratch), which the children have been using since year 3.

Year 3

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To generate specification
  • To generate initial design ideas
  • Introduce basic sewing skills: threading needle, tying knots, tying off

Week 2

Outcome

  • To continue basic sewing skills
  • To practice new techniques on prototype: Running stich, Back stitch, Half Cross stitch, Cross Stitch

Week 3

Outcome

  • To design bookmark on dotted paper
  • To practice new techniques on prototype: Running stich, Back stitch, Half Cross stitch, Cross Stitch

Week 4

Outcome

  • Visual Evalutation as a class
  • To start sewing design onto bookmark

Week 5

Outcome

  • To continue sewing design onto bookmark

Week 6

Outcome

  • To finish sewing design onto bookmark

Week 7

Outcome

  • To continue sewing design onto bookmark

Week 8

Outcome

  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To classify a variety of vegetables into groups

Week 2

Outcome

  • To know the seasonality of a variety of fruits and vegetables

Week 3

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To generate a specification
  • To learn and practice two new cutting techniques, including: baton and dice

Week 4

Outcome

  • To learn and practice new cutting techniques, including: bridge and claw method, baton, dice, chiffonade, slice and ribbon

Week 5

Outcome

  • To plan and design our salad

Week 6

Outcome

  • To prepare and plate salad
  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To complete initial visual research (art nouveau, arts and crafts, art deco, Bauhaus)
  • To generate specification
  • To generate initial design ideas

Week 2

Outcome

  • To measure and cut wood for chair
  • Health and Safety demonstration

Week 3

Outcome

  • To measure and cut wood for chair
  • Visual evaluation whole class

Week 4

Outcome

  • To measure and cut wood for chair
  • To sand wood for chair
  • Introduce adhesives, start gluing chair

Week 5

Outcome

  • To continue the gluing process of chair
  • To complete chair design ideas

Week 6

Outcome

  • Paint chair
  • Complete Evaluation

Sewing

Year 3 starts by focusing on basic sewing skills, where they design and make a bookmark. The pupils are first introduced to any project specific tools and materials they will use throughout the term, in this case embroidery needles, Binca and thread. They are then taught to thread their needles and to tie knots before learning basic stitches, such as running or cross stitch.

 

These skills are taught in year 2, however this project recaps these skills whilst teaching the children to work independently and allows for creative problem solving. They are encouraged to use the skills and tools they have been given to create a product that is entirely their own.

 

We feel it is integral for the children to practice their dexterity and fine motor skills during these early D&T lessons, in order for them to succeed in the projects to come.

Fruits, Vegetables, Cutting Techniques and Styling

Their next project is to make a salad. This project focuses on the seasonality of fruits and vegetables, as well as cutting techniques and food styling. The children learn how to organise fruits and vegetables into their classification categories by learning how, where and when they grow. The children are encouraged to taste the vegetables and fruits they are given, whilst they are working on their cutting techniques, which has proven to increase the children’s interest in healthy foods.

 

They learn classic French cutting techniques, such as baton and chiffonade,
which encourage the children to think about presentation and accuracy. They are asked to design their plate of salad, according to a design brief, using the ingredients and techniques they have learnt. This project brings together many aspects of the D&T national curriculum by focusing on practical skills, as well as aesthetics and nutrition.

Woodwork

By Summer term, the children are ready to complete their first woodwork project – a maquette of a chair. By this point in the year, the children have become familiar with the design concepts and expectations during D&T lessons and we feel they are now old enough to be given more responsibility.

 

We start the project by teaching the children about design movements; this allows us to talk about design in context. The children begin to understand why products look the way they do in context to the time they were made. We discuss material choices, as well as aesthetics, and use quizzing to cement the characteristics of each design movement.

 

The children compare the work of William Morris, looking at the breadth of his design work, which builds on their knowledge of his printed patterns learnt during art lessons. The historical information is recapped at the beginning of each lesson to ensure the children retain the knowledge throughout the project.

 

As this is their first time working with wood independently, we introduce each tool they will use one at a time and discuss how it should be used to ensure that they are aware of the risks and expectations. We have found that by allowing the children to work independently with tools, such as junior hacksaws, the children are keen to build on their skills in a safe, but creative environment.

 

This project has cross curricular links with other subjects, such as maths and of course art, to help the process of building a functional and aesthetically pleasing chair.

Autumn

Textiles: developing sewing techniques

  • Bookmark

Spring

Food Technology: cutting techniques, seasonality & classification of fruit and vegetables

  • Prepare a plate of salad

Summer

Woodwork – basic joinery 

  • Wooden chair

Year 4

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To complete initial visual research
  • To generate specification
  • To generate initial design ideas

Week 2

Outcome

  • Recap basic sewing skills (running  stitch, back stitch, half cross stitch, cross stitch)
  • To generate final design with sewn boarder
  • Visual evaluation whole class
  • To transfer final design onto polystyrene tile

Week 4

Outcome

  • To print design onto fabric (Binca)
  • To practice sewing skills

Week 3

Outcome

  • To embroider  boarder onto printed Binca

Week 5

Outcome

  • To continue embroidery

 

Extension

  • To design an additional embroidered element

Week 6

Outcome

  • To complete embroidery

 

Extension

  • To design an additional embroidered element
  • To sew an additional design element

Week 7

Outcome

  • To evaluate final design and end product using star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To discuss and define the characteristics of a sandwich
  • To explore the history of sandwiches
  • To understand different food groups and their importance in relation to our brief

Week 2

Outcome

  • To compare contrasting bread types.(White, whole meal, 50/50, gluten free, rye, sour dough. flat bread)
  • How is bread made?

 

Practical

  • Taste Panel

Week 3

Outcome

  • Introduce filling ingredients (dairy, vegan, fruit and veg, fats and sugars)
  • Taste panel – curated combinations
  • To design own sandwich using results from taste panel
  • Exploded diagram

Week 4

Practical – 2 lessons combined

  • Morning lesson to make dough and let rise (30min lesson)
  • Come back after an hour and shape into rolls, do second rise (15 min lesson)
  • Bake them over lunch
  • Once cooled children construct sandwich
  • Complete taste panel (60 min lesson)

Week 5

Practical – 2 lessons combined

  • Morning lesson to make dough and let rise (30min lesson)
  • Come back after an hour and shape into rolls, do second rise (15 min lesson)
  • Bake them over lunch
  • Once cooled children construct sandwich
  • Complete taste panel (60 min lesson)

Week 6

Outcome

  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile
  • Quiz

Week 1

Outcome

  • To investigate the history of toys
  • Design styles  1940- 2000

Week 2

Outcome

  • To introduce design brief and Specification
  • To generate design ideas for marble maze

Week 3

Outcome

  • To generate a scale model of final design idea

Week 4

Outcome

  • To cut wooden dowel with accuracy using a Junior Hacksaw

Week 5

Outcome

  • To perfect wood finishing techniques. (sandpaper & adhesive)

Week 6

Outcome

  • To complete construction
  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Textiles

Year 4 starts with a textiles project, which aims to build on the sewing skills they learnt in year 3. The design brief is to create a pattern inspired by the Yanomami tribe, that will be printed onto fabric and then embellished with embroidered elements.

 

This project links with their geography topic, Brazil, as the children discuss how the colours, patterns and materials compare to products made in England and the rest of the world. They create their own specification through evaluating existing designs made by the Yanomami tribe, so that their end product meets the design brief. They complete a printing project in year 3, during art lessons, so are able to use their skills to create the printed element of their product.

 

The expectation for the accuracy of the embroidered element is higher than in year 3, as the children have a larger surface area to work on with a smaller time frame. They are given multiple opportunities to evaluate their work, both through discussions and written statements. This process encourages the children to reflect on their skills so that they are able to improve their work.

Sandwich

To build on the knowledge learnt in year 3 with the salad project, Year 4 pupils make a sandwich. We decided to choose a sandwich, as this allowed us to investigate food groups, such as carbohydrates, dairy, fruits and vegetables and protein, as well as oils, fats and sugars. The project goes into great detail about each group, so that the children are given multiple opportunities to taste and evaluate ingredients, which furthers their understanding. Through balancing practical and knowledge lead lessons, the children are able to build an understanding of nutrition and the importance of a balanced diet in relation to their own health. We discuss the reasons for gluten free and vegan options and why these ingredients are important in relation to food allergies, as well as personal choice.

 

Once the children understand the ingredients included in a sandwich, we then look into the process of making. They are given a wide range of ingredients to choose from, which they then use to create a recipe. This includes a list of ingredients, instructions and an exploded diagram of their finished sandwich. By taking a relatively simple product like a sandwich, we are then able to go into great detail about each ingredient and stage of making. This project includes science (food groups), maths (conversion, units of measurement) as well as design.

 

They build on their knowledge learnt in year 3 by choosing cutting techniques right for their sandwich and learn new knife skills, such as spreading. They learn how to put ingredients together to create new flavours and are encouraged to try ingredients that they previously would not consider. By giving the children the knowledge, then allowing them to explore combinations, the children are well informed and at the same time keen to experiment.

Bridge

For their final project of the year, the children complete a bridge project. They are given Artstraws, PVA and a set of conditions about length and the weight that the bridge must be able to hold and are tasked to design and construct a bridge. They learn to differentiate between different types of bridges and learn how they are constructed. We discuss the pros and cons of each design element and analyse existing bridges to start to form ideas.

 

We start the making stage of the project by introducing the children to techniques that join and reinforce the straws. The children are encouraged to experiment with the materials and to find ways that work for them, as well as following instructions we give them. They learn how to build more complex structures, discovering how certain shapes work better than others and why that is.

 

Though the children create their own bridge, we encourage the sharing of ideas as a class and small groups. The children are given opportunities to evaluate their work at every step of the way and discuss their strengths and weaknesses in a constructive environment. After much experimentation and discussion, the children design their bridge, first as a sketch, and then complete a working drawing before they start the final build.

 

In year 3, the children are given a list of measurements, which they have to follow in order to complete their chair, this project however is about giving the children the tools to make their own choices, so we only give them a maximum length and the rest is up to them. This way, children learn to work iteratively, which allows for their confidence to grow and for their problem solving skills to
develop.

Autumn

Textiles: embroidery and print making

  • Yanoomami square

Spring

Food Technology: food groups, baking bread and preparing and assembling ingredients

  • Bread and sandwich making

Summer

Strengthen and reinforce complex structures using artstraws

  • Bridges

Year 5

Week 1

Outcome

  • To construct a programmable controller

Week 2

Outcome

  • To program a controller to react to a light sensor

Week 3

Outcome

  • To program a controller that creates white light using RGB values

Week 4

Outcome

  • To program a controller to use ascending and descending RGB values in a cycle

Week 5

Outcome

  • To finish programming a controller to use ascending and descending RGB values in a cycle. To program a controller to react to a light sensor

Week 6

Outcome

  • To construct a geometric lampshade

Week 7

Outcome

  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To define the purpose of each ingredient in a basic muffin recipe
  • History of baking

Week 2

Outcome

  • To prepare and bake a simple muffin recipe in groups
  • To understand the role each ingredient has on the integrity of the recipe
  • Write prediction

Week 3

Outcome

  • To analyse results of baking experiment
  • To design own muffin recipe

Week 4

Outcome

  • To prepare and bake own healthy muffin recipe in groups
  • To complete a taste panel for your muffin(Double Lesson)

Week 5

Outcome

  • To prepare and bake own healthy muffin recipe in groups
  • To complete a taste panel for your muffin(Double Lesson)

Week 6

Outcome

  • To evaluate final product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To complete initial visual research
  • To generate specification
  • To generate measurements for our design ideas
  • Introduce basic sewing skills

Week 2

Outcome

  • To understand the importance of pattern cutting
  • To complete design idea
  • To practice basic sewing skills

Week 3

Outcome

  • To convert design idea to pattern paper
  • To transfer pattern onto felt with accuracy
  • To cut felt with accuracy
  • To pin felt together
  • To start sewing product together

Week 4

Outcome

  • To sew product together
  • To insert stuffing and continue to complete sewing of product
  • To apply face, eyes, mouth etc. to product

Week 5

Outcome

  • To finish sewing product together
  • To finish inserting stuffing and continue to complete sewing of product

Week 6

Outcome

  • To finish applying face, eyes, mouth etc. to product
  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Night Light

By year 5, the children are ready to be introduced to the more complex concepts of the D&T curriculum. In this project, the children learn how to code and build a colour changing night light, which uses a light sensor to turn on and off. We use Crumble controllers and software to introduce the children to the possibilities of control and electronics to create products for the modern age.

 

This project celebrates technology and challenges the way in which the children think about the technology that they use in their daily lives. The software we use to code the Crumbles has been designed to mimic the software used in computing (Scratch), which the children have been using since year 3. This is fundamental in the pace in which the children progress, when using the Crumble software, as they are able to transfer skills learnt previously.

 

The project requires the children to create a working circuit, which builds on their learning of electricity and circuits in their science topic in year 4, but with added components, such as LEDs, light sensors and, of course, the Crumble controller.

 

The children are given various sections of code that they have to recreate in stages to break down the components of the process needed to create the final product. They learn about RGB colour values and use them to test light and colour theory, which they will study in year 6.

 

The project introduces the children to complex coding processes and ideas, which challenge their problem solving skills and independence. Both the circuit and the code must be correct in order for their light to be functional, so they must work accurately in order to succeed. Once their lights are working, they must then build a geometric lampshade out of cardboard. They are then able to use their knowledge of nets, learnt in maths, which puts their knowledge to practical use. This project builds the children’s confidence by encouraging independent work.

Woodworking

Year 5 follow this project by building a marble maze out of wood. The project builds on the wood working skills they learnt in year 3, as well as the design skills learnt in year 4 in the bridge project. The children are given a brief and a list of design criteria that their end product must meet.

 

By working to a brief, the children are able to focus on using the materials they have been given to create a functional and visually interesting final product. They learn how to cut wooden dowel at 45 degree angles to create mitre joints, which opens up their design possibilities. Before they are given any wood the children must generate initial design ideas, which they then develop before finally creating scale models of their final design.

 

The tools are introduced and the expectations and risks are made clear as before. Though, as the children have used these tools in year 3, we have found that their confidence and accuracy is far higher than you would expect from other children of the same age. This project requires accurate measurement and cutting skills to create the level of finish that is expected. The children learn to perfect their skills learnt previously, which improves dexterity and coordination.

Baking

The final project the Year 5s complete is a muffin project. As is done in year 4 with the sandwich project, we have taken a relatively simple concept, which enables us to go into great detail in other areas.

 

The children study the ingredients of a simple muffin recipe, in depth, to learn the role of each ingredient. We look into the science of baking and how each ingredient works together to create the characteristics of a muffin that we all know and love.

 

To further cement the children’s understanding, we test the function of each ingredient in a muffin recipe by conducting an experiment. The children are put into groups, where they are given all but one of the ingredients needed. They are then able to see how this affects the recipe both before and after cooking. This knowledge enables the children to develop an advanced understanding of the process of baking. Once they have recorded the results they then get into pairs and design their own recipe. They have to write their list of ingredients and the process that they will use to make their muffin. They learn why it is important to mix certain ingredients and certain times to create the best results according to their knowledge of the scientific role of each ingredient.

 

They are allowed to use two additional ingredients and can swap out others to allow for both allergies and for personal preference. For example, eggs are binders, but if you do not want to use eggs you can substitute them for bananas to create similar results. When they get to the baking process, the children know what they need to be looking for when it comes to things like consistency, which is an advanced skill in baking.

 

The project requires them to use their maths skills with measurement and conversion. They use their understanding from previous years to make choices about the ingredients they use and are aware of the effects some of ingredients have on our health. We are then able to discuss the importance of a balanced diet in great detail during this project and how to consume certain foods in moderation. They learn how to crack eggs and to combine ingredients, which are important life skills.

Autumn

Electrical systems: program and control using crumble code

  • Nightlight

Spring

Woodwork – advanced joinery

  • Marble Maze

Summer

Food Technology: food groups, preparing and cooking ingredients 

  • Muffins

Year 6

Week 1

Outcome

  • To understand the main features of a Morse Code Machine
  • To introduce the design brief
  • To generate specification
  • To generate measurements for boarder and obstacles

Week 2

Outcome

  • To cut lengths of wooden dowel with accuracy using a junior hacksaw
  • To construct the circuit board

Week 3

Outcome

  • To cut wood with accuracy using a Tenon Saw
  • To construct switch our switch

Week 4

Outcome

  • To use adhesive accurately
  • To glue circuit board in place
  • To apply finishing techniques (sanding) to switch

Week 5

Outcome

  • To construct a parallel circuit
  • To finish sanding switch

Week 6

Outcome

  • To construct switch (torsion spring) and attach circuit
  • To glue switch to circuit board
  • To attach circuit to circuit board

Week 7

Outcome

  • To test function of finished product
  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To compare existing products
  • To generate specification
  • Generate initial design ideas

Week 2

Outcome

  • To measure relevant equipment accurately
  • Use measurements to determine the dimensions of your product
  • To design and draw pattern for product

Week 3

Outcome

  • To transfer pattern onto Calico
  • Recap sewing skills
  • Introduce cotton thread, needles, demonstrate back stitch

Week 4

Outcome

  • To start sewing product together
  • To attach fastening

 

Extension

  • Add additional embroidered elements

Week 5

Outcome

  • To complete sewing product together
  • To finish attaching fastening

 

Extension

  • Finish additional embroidered elements

Week 6

Outcome

  • To complete sewing product together
  • To finish attaching fastening

 

Extension

  • Finish additional embroidered elements
  • To evaluate final design and product using a star profile

Week 1

Outcome

  • To introduce the design brief
  • To discuss and define the characteristics of pasta
  • To explore the History of Pasta

Week 2

Outcome

  • To examine the characteristics of a pasta recipe
  • Egg whites, egg yolks, water: Identifying the best source of hydration

Week 3

Rhos y Gwaliau

Week 4

Outcome

  • To describe and demonstrate how to make fresh pasta in groups(Make dough to be used next week)

Week 5

Outcome

  • To describe and demonstrate how to create tagliatelle
  • Roll out Pasta from last week

Week 5

Outcome

  • To complete evaluation using a star profile
  • Complete end of topic quiz

Parking Sensor

Through their years at CJS, our students have been given the opportunity to create products that span the entire D&T national curriculum, which means in year 6 we are able to experiment with techniques that we have learnt over the years to create creative challenging outcomes.

The children use the Crumbles in this first project to create a parking sensor. They expand on the knowledge they have learnt in year 5 and get to introduce new elements, such as buzzers and motion sensors. This project has been designed to encourage independent problem solving and critical thinking throughout. By the end of this project, the children are able to program
their Crumbles to react to multiple conditions. For example, the Crumble will be able to change colours according to how close they are to an object, as well as making noise when objects become too close.

 

Though the aim of the project is to build a parking sensor, the project encourages the children to discuss how this technology could be used for other products. The children are then asked to design such a product and produce a presentation and working drawing of their design. This project combines the practical code, control and manufacture of electronics, whilst at the same time encourages the children to think creatively about the limits of technology. The children will present their final ideas to the class, to both celebrate and evaluate their achievements.

Textiles

Their second project focuses on textiles and explores fashion and technology through our time.

The children are tasked with two miniature projects within the term, this allows us to experiment with multiple techniques and processes. Each technique is put into context with a time period to emphasise the technological advancements within the fashion industry. Through a combination of practical and knowledge lead lessons, the children will gain a firm understanding of the fashion industry and how it has changed over time.

 

They will build on their learning of printing from year 4 in D&T and Art in year 3, to produce lino printed fabrics and garments taking inspiration from designers, such as Thomas Burberry. The children will have access to a vinyl cutter and CAD software to produce stencils and or iron on logos/patterns to create branded garments and or patterned fabric swatches.

 

The children will research current brands and logos and discuss their success and or failures and use this information to design their own brand. This project brings together skills from both old and new technologies to produce end products that are creative which take the best from both techniques.

Fairground

The final project for our students explores the mechanical systems of a fairground. The children learn how gears, pulleys, cams and levers are used to produce complex moving structures in context. This project requires the children to draw upon all their past learning in projects to design and construct a working model of a ride you would find in a fairground.

 

Through researching the structures and mechanisms used in real rides, the children will learn to ‘magpie’ ideas from existing structures. They will spend the first half of their project producing models and tests using the equipment, such as motors, to generate initial ideas. Through class discussions and written evaluations, the children are able to express their ideas in a constructive and creative environment. The skills that have been gained throughout their time at Churchfields will equip them for this final challenge.

Autumn

Electrical and mechanical systems: program, control and use a sensor using crumble code

  • Parking sensor

Spring

Textiles – CAD design and vinyl printing

  • Printed t-shirt

Summer

Mechanical systems: gears, pulleys, cams and levers

  • Fairground