Spelling Handbook

We choose the spelling words from the revised National Curriculum list. Each year group has their own list of words for every week of the year and their associated rules. Word lists will be given as homework each week and correlate with the list in the Spelling Handbook.

Teacher and child looking at writing

Week 1

To identify silent letters in words from different origins

Silent letters in words – different origins 

  • answer
  • guard
  • guide
  • heard
  • heart
  • island
  • knowledge
  • learn
  • know
  • reign

 High frequency

  • said
  • they

Week 2

To compare which words have a silent ‘h’ and which do not (need to learn the specifics)

Some ‘w’ words have a silent ‘h’; others do not – need to learn the specifics 

  • when
  • where
  • when
  • what
  • which
  • why
  • went
  • were
  • white
  • whistle

 High frequency

  • that
  • with

Week 3

To identify the silent ‘e’ and its impact

The silent ‘e’ changes the sound of the vowel that precedes it, e.g. ‘rid’ to ‘ride’ 

  • arrive
  • complete
  • decide
  • describe
  • favourite
  • imagine
  • opposite
  • sentence
  • separate
  • breathe

 High frequency

  • what
  • there

Week 4

To recognise that ‘ate’ can also be spelt ‘eight’

‘ate’ can also be spelt ‘eight’ and ‘aight’ 

  • late
  • mate
  • straight
  • weight
  • eight
  • freight
  • rotate
  • activate
  • concentrate
  • plate

 High frequency

  • this
  • have

Week 5

To recognise double letters in common spellings words

These words all contain double letters 

  • address
  • appear
  • different
  • difficult
  • grammar
  • possible
  • pressure
  • cheese
  • current
  • blossom

 High frequency

  • went
  • hello

Week 6

To discuss plural nouns that have an ‘o’ after a consonant  add ‘es’

Plural nouns that have an ‘o’ after a consonant  add ‘es’ 

  • volcanoes
  • potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • heroes
  • torpedoes
  • echoes
  • zeroes
  • buffaloes
  • grottoes
  • mosquitoes

 High frequency

  • little
  • were

Week 7

To identify the soft ‘c’ sound

If the ‘c’ comes before an ‘e’, i’ or ‘y, it is pronounced ‘s’ 

  • centre
  • exercise
  • experience
  • certain
  • circle
  • recent
  • medicine
  • special
  • cellar
  • ace

 High frequency

  • down
  • when

Week 1

To analyse the ‘ort’ sound

There is more than one spelling for the sound “ort” 

  • caught
  • naughty
  • thought
  • bought
  • sort
  • taught
  • short
  • distraught
  • transport
  • nought

 High frequency

  • looked
  • very

Week 2

To compare the different sounds for the spelling ‘ough’

There is no specific spelling rule for the ‘ough’ string. Children could sort into the different sounds. 

  • enough
  • though
  • although
  • thought
  • through
  • borough
  • plough
  • dough
  • rough
  • cough

 High frequency

  • don’t
  • come

Week 3

To analyse the ‘ar’ sound

Discuss the odd ones out and why the sound is different  (look at the stressed syllable) 

  • February
  • library
  • ordinary
  • regular
  • popular
  • particular
  • early
  • earth
  • starve
  • March

 High frequency

  • will
  • back

Week 4

To discuss spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • believe
  • experiment
  • famous
  • group
  • history
  • important
  • length
  • increase
  • interest
  • material
  • natural
  • often
  • perhaps
  • probably
  • quarter
  • remember
  • strength
  • therefore
  • woman
  • women
  • promise
  • busy
  • business

 High frequency

  • into
  • from

Week 5

To discuss spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • believe
  • experiment
  • famous
  • group
  • history
  • important
  • length
  • increase
  • interest
  • material
  • natural
  • often
  • perhaps
  • probably
  • quarter
  • remember
  • strength
  • therefore
  • woman
  • women
  • promise
  • busy
  • business

 High frequency

  • children
  • just

Week 6

To identify the ‘k’ sound spelt ‘ch’

These words have originated from Greek words, so the spelling has stayed the same 

  • scheme
  • chorus
  • chemist
  • echo
  • character
  • anchor
  • stomach
  • character
  • echo
  • technology
  • monarch

 High frequency

  • came
  • about

Week 7

To revise commonly misspelt wordsTo revise maths words

Maths words Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher 

  • addition
  • subtraction
  • multiplication
  • division
  • share
  • difference
  • minute
  • hour

 High frequency

  • their
  • people

Week 1

To add suffixes beginning with vowels to polysyllabic words

If the last syllable of a word is stressed and ends with one consonant letter (with just one vowel before it), the final consonant letter is doubled before any ending beginning with a vowel letter is added 

  • forgetting
  • forgotten
  • beginning
  • beginner
  • prefer
  • preferred
  • gardening
  • gardener
  • limited
  • limitation

 High frequency

  • your
  • cold

Week 2

To identify the ‘i’ sound in the middle of words spelt with a ‘y’

 

  • sympathy
  • myth
  • gym
  • pyramid
  • mystery
  • symbol
  • oxygen
  • system
  • typical
  • lyrics

 High frequency

  • house
  • made

Week 3

To recognise that ‘u’ sound is also spelt ‘ou’

 

  • young
  • touch
  • double
  • trouble
  • country
  • courage
  • encourage
  • cousin
  • enough
  • tough

 High frequency

  • time
  • I’m

Week 4

To compare the prefixes:
‘un’, ‘dis’ and ‘mis’

‘un’, ‘dis’ and ‘mis’ have negative meanings 

  • disappoint
  • disagree
  • disobey
  • disrespect
  • unable
  • unofficial
  • unnecessary
  • misbehave
  • mislead
  • misspell

 High frequency

  • help
  • called

Week 5

To analyse the “in”, il, im and ir prefixes

‘in’ can mean  ‘not’ and ‘in into’; ‘in’ becomes il before a root word beginning with ‘l’; ‘in’ becomes im before a root word beginning with ‘m’ or ‘p’; ‘in’ becomes ir before a root word beginning with ir 

  • inactive
  • incorrect
  • illegal
  • illegible
  • immature
  • impossible
  • impatient
  • irresponsible
  • irregular
  • irrelevant

 High frequency

  • here
  • off

Week 6

To compare the prefixes: ‘re’, ‘sub’, ‘inter’

‘re’ means ‘again’ or ‘back’; ‘sub’ means ‘under’; ‘inter’ means ‘between’ or ‘among’ 

  • redo
  • refresh
  • return
  • reappear
  • redecorate
  • subdivide
  • subheading
  • submerge
  • interact
  • international

 High frequency

  • asked
  • make

Week 1

To compare the use of prefixes ‘super’, ‘anti’, ‘auto’

‘super’ means  ‘above’; ‘anti’ means  ‘against’; ‘auto’ means  ‘self’ or ‘own’ 

  • supermarket
  • superman
  • superstar
  • antiseptic
  • antidote
  • anti-clockwise
  • antisocial
  • autobiography
  • autograph
  • automatic

 High frequency

  • water
  • away

Week 2

To discuss the use of the  suffixes:  ‘ation’

The suffix ation is added to verbs to form nouns 

  • information
  • adoration
  • sensation
  • preparation
  • admiration
  • creation
  • attention
  • prevention
  • multiplication
  • celebration

 High frequency

  • good
  • want

Week 3

To identify the use of the suffixes ‘ly’

The suffix ly is added to an adjective to form an adverb 

  • sadly
  • completely
  • usually
  • finally
  • comically
  • particularly
  • certainly
  • suddenly
  • actually
  • immediately

 High frequency

  • over
  • how

Week 4

To compare the use of the suffixes: ‘ly’ and ‘ally’

If the root word ends in ‘y’, change to an ibefore adding lyIf the root word ends in ‘le’, the ‘le’ is changed to lyIf the root word ends in ic, ‘ally’ is added instead of ly 

  • happily
  • angrily
  • gently
  • simply
  • humbly
  • nobly
  • basically
  • frantically
  • dramatically
  • manically

 High frequency

  • going
  • where

Week 5

To compare the ending ‘sure’ + ‘ture’

Always ‘sure’ for ‘s’ sounding endings, ture for nouns that can’t be verbs, e.g. teacher vs creature, catcher vs furniture 

  • measure
  • treasure
  • pleasure
  • enclosure
  • creature
  • furniture
  • picture
  • nature
  • adventure
  • capture

 High frequency

  • would
  • took

Week 6

To analyse the spelling when the ending sounds like ‘shun’

If the ending of nouns sounds like ‘shun’, it is spelt sion 

  • invasion
  • division
  • confusion
  • decision
  • collision
  • television
  • explosion
  • corrosion
  • confession

 High frequency

  • school
  • think

Week 1

To discuss the “ous” suffix

ous added to root word changes a noun to an adjective, ‘our’ is changed to ‘or’ before ous is added 

  • poisonous
  • dangerous
  • mountainous
  • famous
  • various
  • humorous
  • glamorous
  • vigorous
  • courageous
  • tremendous
  • nervous

 High frequency

  • know
  • bear

Week 2

To compare suffixes

If there is an i sound before the ous, it is usually spelt with an i, but a few words have ‘e’ 

  • serious
  • obvious
  • curious
  • hideous
  • spontaneous
  • courteous
  • enormous
  • discussion
  • occasion
  • vigorous

 High frequency

  • can’t
  • again

Week 3

To compare suffixes that sound like ‘shun’

Generally the suffixes are ‘-ion’ and ‘-ian’. The letters that come before this are either ‘t’ (the most common), ‘s’, ‘ss’ or ‘c’.If the root word ends in ‘t’ or ‘te’, it is usually ‘ion’.If the root word ends in ‘c’ or ‘c’, it is usually ‘cian’.If the root word ends in ‘ss’ or ‘mit’, it is usually ‘ssion’.If the root word ends in ‘d’ or ‘se’, it is usually ‘sion’. 

  • invention
  • injection
  • section
  • position
  • mention
  • question
  • completion
  • musician
  • magician
  • mathematician

 High frequency

  • long
  • things

Week 4

To compare suffixes that sound like ‘shun’

Generally the suffixes are ‘-ion’ and ‘-ian’. The letters that come before this are either ‘t’ (the most common), ‘s’, ‘ss’ or ‘c’.If the root word ends in ‘t’ or ‘te’, it is usually ‘ion’.If the root word ends in ‘c’ or ‘c’, it is usually ‘cian’.If the root word ends in ‘ss’ or ‘mit’, it is usually ‘ssion’.If the root word ends in ‘d’ or ‘se’, it is usually ‘sion’. 

  • expression
  • discussion
  • confession
  • permission
  • admission
  • expansion
  • extension
  • comprehension
  • tension
  • possession

 High frequency

  • after
  • wanted

Week 5

To discuss the ‘gue’ and ‘que’ sounds

These words have originated from French words, so the spelling has stayed the same 

  • tongue
  • league
  • antique
  • unique
  • vague
  • catalogue
  • synagogue
  • dialogue
  • mosque
  • unique

 High frequency

  • everyone
  • our

Week 6

To identify words spelt ‘ch’ but with the sh sound

These words mostly have a French origin 

  • chef
  • chalet
  • brochure
  • machine
  • charade
  • parachute
  • chivalry

 High frequency

  • two
  • play

Week 1

To discuss the ‘s’ sound spelt ‘sc

These words have originated from Latin- The Romans 

  • science
  • scene
  • discipline
  • fascinate
  • crescent
  • fascinate
  • scissors
  • scented
  • scenery
  • descend

 High frequency

  • take
  • thought

Week 2

To compare the ‘ay’ sound spelt ‘ei’, ‘eigh’ or ‘ey’

No specific rule 

  • vein
  • weight
  • eight
  • neighbour
  • they
  • obey
  • rein
  • sleigh
  • survey
  • convey

 High frequency

  • well
  • find

Week 3

To explain  the possessive apostrophe

The apostrophe is placed after the plural form of the word;  ‘s’ is not added if the plural already ends in  ‘s’, but is added if the plural does not end in ‘s’ (e.g. children’s) 

  • girls’
  • boys’
  • babies’
  • children’s
  • men’s
  • mice’s
  • parent’s
  • teacher’s
  • helper’s
  • auntie’s

 High frequency

  • more
  • I’ll

Week 4

To explain homophones or near-homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word ,but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • accept
  • except
  • affect
  • effect
  • ball
  • bawl
  • here
  • hear
  • brake
  • break

 High frequency

  • round
  • tree

Week 5

To explain homophones or near-homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • mail
  • male
  • main
  • mane
  • meat
  • meet
  • weather
  • whether
  • whose
  • who’s

 High frequency

  • magic
  • shouted

Week 6

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • other
  • food

Week 1

To identify silent letters in words from different origins

Silent letters in words – different origins 

  • honest
  • write
  • wreck
  • wrong
  • wrist
  • gnaw
  • rustle
  • glisten
  • mortgage
  • mechanic

 High frequency

  • said
  • they

Week 2

To compare which ‘w’ words have a silent ‘h’ and which do not (need to learn the specifics)

Some ‘w’ words have a silent ‘h’; others do not – need to learn the specifics 

  • when
  • where
  • what
  • which
  • wheat
  • were
  • white
  • whistle
  • whisper

 High frequency

  • that
  • with

Week 3

To show the silent ‘e’ changes the sound of the vowel that precedes it (eg ‘rid’ to ‘ride’)

The silent ‘e’ changes the sound of the vowel that precedes it, e.g. ‘rid’ to ‘ride’ 

  • huge
  • complete
  • handle
  • describe
  • favourite
  • extreme
  • opposite
  • sentence
  • separate
  • quite

 High frequency

  • what
  • there

Week 4

To recognise that ‘ate’ can also be spelt ‘eight’

‘ate’ can also be spelt ‘eight’ 

  • calculate
  • negate
  • straight
  • accurate
  • eight
  • freight
  • educate
  • complicate
  • concentrate
  • evaporate

 High frequency

  • this
  • have

Week 5

To recognise these words all contain double letters

These words all contain double letters 

  • occasion
  • classical
  • scissors
  • planned
  • suppose
  • attitude
  • shuffle
  • mood
  • blossom
  • accident

 High frequency

  • went
  • hello

Week 6

To discuss plural nouns that have an ‘o’ after a consonant  add ‘es’

Plural nouns that have an ‘o’ after a consonant  add ‘es’ 

  • volcanoes
  • potatoes
  • tomatoes
  • heroes
  • tornadoes
  • tomatoes
  • zeroes
  • buffaloes
  • grottoes
  • dominoes

 High frequency

  • little
  • were

Week 7

To identify the soft ‘c’ sound

If the ‘c’ comes before an ‘e’, i’ or ‘y, it is pronounced ‘s’ 

  • centre
  • certain
  • circle
  • recent
  • medicine
  • special
  • cyclist
  • adjacent
  • accident
  • juicy

 High frequency

  • down
  • when

Week 1

To analyse the ‘ort’ sound

There is more than one spelling for the sound “ort” 

  • bought
  • brought
  • thought
  • sought
  • consort
  • slaughter
  • distraught
  • daughter
  • nought

 High frequency

  • looked
  • very

Week 2

To compare the different sounds for the spelling ‘ough’

There is no specific spelling rule for the ‘ough’ string. Children could sort into the different sounds. 

  • enough
  • fought
  • although
  • drought
  • thoughtful
  • borough
  • plough
  • doughnut
  • tough
  • cough

 High frequency

  • don’t
  • come

Week 3

To analyse the ‘ar’ sound

Discuss the odd ones out and why the sound is different  (look at the stressed syllable) 

  • party
  • library
  • artist
  • yard
  • darken
  • garlic
  • carton
  • earth
  • target
  • varnish

 High frequency

  • will
  • back

Week 4

To investigate spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • believe
  • experiment
  • famous
  • group
  • history
  • important
  • length
  • increase
  • interest
  • material
  • natural
  • often
  • perhaps
  • probably
  • quarter
  • remember
  • strength
  • therefore
  • woman
  • women
  • promise
  • busy
  • business

 High frequency

  • into
  • from

Week 5

To investigate spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • believe
  • experiment
  • famous
  • group
  • history
  • important
  • length
  • increase
  • interest
  • material
  • natural
  • often
  • perhaps
  • probably
  • quarter
  • remember
  • strength
  • therefore
  • woman
  • women
  • promise
  • busy
  • business

 High frequency

  • children
  • just

Week 6

To recognise words starting ‘ch’ but with the sh sound

These words mostly have a French origin 

  • chef
  • chalet
  • brochure
  • machine 
  • charade
  • parachute
  • chivalry

 High frequency

  • came
  • about

Week 7

To revise commonly misspellt wordsTo revise  maths terminology

Maths words Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher

  • addition
  • subtraction
  • multiplication
  • division
  • share
  • difference
  • minute
  • hour

 High frequency

  • their
  • people

Week 1

To add suffixes beginning with vowels to polysyllabic words

If the last syllable of a word is stressed & ends with one consonant letter (with just one vowel before it), the final consonant letter is doubled before any ending beginning with a vowel letter is added 

  • forgetting
  • forgotten
  • inspiring
  • disobeyed
  • prefer
  • preferred
  • gardening
  • gardener
  • limited
  • imitation

 High frequency

  • your
  • could

Week 2

To identify the ‘i’ sound in the middle of words spelt with a ‘y’

 

  • physics
  • cycle
  • rhyme
  • cylinder
  • dynasty
  • cyclone
  • oxygen
  • system
  • typical
  • lyrics

 High frequency

  • house
  • made

Week 3

To recognise that ‘u’ sound is also spelt ‘ou’

 

  • nourish
  • flourish
  • ambitious
  • flourish
  • country
  • courage
  • encourage
  • cousin
  • enough
  • tough

 High frequency

  • time
  • I’m

Week 4

To compare the prefixes:
‘un’, ‘dis’ and ‘mis’

‘un’, ‘dis’ and ‘mis’ have negative meanings 

  • disappear
  • misfortune
  • misprint
  • displace
  • mistreat
  • mistrust
  • uncertain
  • unsatisfactory
  • unaware
  • unnecessary

 High frequency

  • help
  • called

Week 5

To analyse the “in”, il, im and ir  prefixes

‘in’ can mean  ‘not’ and ‘in into’; ‘in’ becomes il before a root word beginning with ‘l’; ‘in’ becomes im before a root word beginning with ‘m’ or ‘p’; ‘in’ becomes ir before a root word beginning with ir 

  • inoffensive
  • incorrect
  • inadequate
  • illegible
  • immigrate
  • impossible
  • impatient
  • irresponsible
  • irregular
  • irrelevant

 High frequency

  • here
  • off

Week 6

To compare the prefixes: ‘re’, ‘sub’, ‘inter’

‘re’ means ‘again’ or ‘back’; ‘sub’ means ‘under’; ‘inter’ means ‘between’ or ‘among’ 

  • reinforce
  • recycling
  • retreat
  • replace
  • reorder
  • subvert
  • subheading
  • subsidy
  • interference
  • intermediate

 High frequency

  • asked
  • make

Week 1

To compare the use of prefixes ‘super’, ‘anti’, ‘auto’

‘super’ means  ‘above’; ‘anti’ means  ‘against’; ‘auto’ means  ‘self’ or ‘own’ 

  • supermarket
  • superficial
  • superstar
  • antiseptic
  • antidote
  • antithesis
  • autobiography
  • autopilot
  • automobile
  • automatic

 High frequency

  • water
  • away

Week 2

To discuss the use of the  suffixes:  ‘ation’

The suffix ation is added to verbs to form nouns 

  • information
  • determination
  • meditation
  • alliteration
  • vegetation
  • exaggeration
  • cancellation
  • discrimination
  • foundation
  • fascination

 High frequency

  • good
  • want

Week 3

To identify the use of the suffixes ‘ly’

The suffix ly is added to an adjective to form an adverb 

  • modify
  • fluently
  • fortunately
  • historically
  • completely
  • consequently
  • eventually
  • necessarily
  • exceptionally
  • exceedingly

 High frequency

  • over
  • how

Week 4

To compare the use of the suffixes:  ‘ly’ and ‘ally’

If the root word ends in ‘y’, change to an ibefore adding lyIf the root word ends in ‘le’, the ‘le’ is changed to lyIf the root word ends in ic, ‘ally’ is added instead of ly  

  • happily
  • angrily
  • anxiously
  • accusingly
  • humbly
  • academically
  • traditionally
  • sentimentally
  • dramatically
  • manically

 High frequency

  • going
  • where

Week 5

To compare the ending ‘sure’ + ‘ture’

Always ‘sure’ for ‘s’ sounding endings, ture for nouns that can’t be verbs, e.g. teacher vs creature, catcher vs furniture 

  • exposure
  • reassure
  • enclosure
  • pleasure
  • treasure
  • overture
  • furniture
  • moisture
  • adventure
  • puncture

 High frequency

  • would
  • took

Week 6

To analyse the spelling when the ending sounds like ‘shun’

If the ending of nouns sounds like ‘shun’, it is spelt sion 

  • invasion
  • suppression
  • confusion
  • decision
  • collision
  • illusion
  • explosion
  • corrosion
  • confession
  • progression

 High frequency

  • school
  • think

Week 1

To demonstrate the ‘s’ sound spelt ‘sc’

These words have originated from Latin – Romans 

  • science
  • scene
  • discipline
  • fascinate
  • crescent
  • fascinate
  • scissors
  • scented
  • scenery
  • descend

 High frequency

  • know
  • bear

Week 2

To identify  the ‘ay’ sound spelt ‘ei’, ‘eigh’ or ‘ey’

No specific rule 

  • vein
  • weight
  • eight
  • neighbour
  • they
  • obey
  • rein
  • sleigh
  • survey
  • convey

 High frequency

  • can’t
  • again

Week 3

To explain the possessive apostrophe

The apostrophe is placed after the plural form of the word;  ‘s’ is not added if the plural already ends in ‘s’, but is added if the plural does not end in ‘s’ (e.g. children’s) 

  • girls’
  • boys’
  • babies’
  • children’s
  • men’s
  • mice’s
  • parent’s
  • teacher’s
  • helper’s
  • auntie’s

 High frequency

  • long
  • things

Week 4

To explain the homophones or near-homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word ,but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • accept
  • except
  • affect
  • effect
  • ball
  • bawl
  • here
  • hear
  • brake
  • break

 High frequency

  • after
  • wanted

Week 5

To explain the homophones or near-homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word ,but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • mail
  • male
  • main
  • mane
  • meat
  • meet
  • weather
  • whether
  • whose
  • who’s

 High frequency

  • everyone
  • our

Week 6

To revise SPaG words

 

  • subordinate
  • coordinate
  • relative
  • sentence
  • clause
  • phrase
  • proper
  • conjunction
  • paragraph

 High frequency

  • two
  • play

Week 1

To identify words spelt ‘ch’ but with the sh sound

These words mostly have a French origin 

  • chagrin
  • chute
  • crochet
  • machine
  • moustache
  • parachute

 High frequency

  • two
  • play

Week 2

To discuss the ‘gue’ and ‘que’ sounds

These words have originated from French words, so the spelling has stayed the same 

  • tongue
  • league
  • antique
  • unique
  • vague
  • catalogue
  • synagogue
  • dialogue
  • Mosque
  • unique

 High frequency

  • take
  • thought

Week 3

To identify additional spellings + revision

 

  • breath
  • build
  • extreme
  • fruit
  • height
  • notice
  • purpose
  • strange
  • surprise
  • consider

 High frequency

  • well
  • find

Week 4

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • more
  • I’ll

Week 5

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • round
  • tree

Week 6

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • magic
  • shouted

Week 1

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • write
  • right
  • no
  • know
  • would
  • wood
  • aloud
  • allowed
  • board
  • bored
  • rein
  • reign

 High frequency

  • through
  • been

Week 2

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • guessed
  • guest
  • heard
  • herd
  • led
  • lead
  • morning
  • mourning
  • past
  • passed
  • precede
  • proceed

 High frequency

  • stop
  • must

Week 3

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • aisle
  • Isle
  • alter
  • altar
  • blue
  • blew
  • council
  • counsel
  • course
  • coarse
  • source
  • sauce

 High frequency

  • door
  • right

Week 4

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • principal
  • principle
  • profit
  • prophet
  • stationary
  • stationery
  • steal
  • steel
  • who’s
  • whose

 High frequency

  • these
  • began

Week 5

To analyse different sounds of ‘ough’

‘ough’ has over ten different pronunciations in UK English 

  • ought
  • bought
  • thought
  • nought
  • brought
  • fought
  • rough
  • tough

 High frequency

  • animals
  • never

Week 6

To analyse different sounds of ‘ough’

‘ough’ has over ten different pronunciations in UK English 

  • enough
  • though
  • although
  • dough
  • through
  • thorough
  • borough
  • plough

 High frequency

  • first
  • work

Week 7

To identify silent letters

Look out for the silent letters together – investigate the history of the words to see why they are there 

  • doubt
  • island
  • solemn
  • thistle
  • knight
  • comb
  • plumber
  • yacht
  • pneumonia

 High frequency

  • that’s
  • mouse

Week 1

To identify silent letters

Look out for the silent letters together – investigate the history of the words to see why they are there 

  • biscuit
  • guest
  • plague
  • sword
  • wrestle
  • rhyme
  • knot
  • subtle
  • column

 High frequency

  • something
  • still

Week 2

To recognise  spellings that change nouns to verbs

The nouns end in ce  and verbs end in -se 

  • advice
  • advise
  • device
  • devise
  • licence
  • license
  • practise
  • practice
  • prophecy
  • prophesy

 High frequency

  • found
  • live

Week 3

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-able/-ably’ is used if there is a related word ending in ‘–ation’.  ‘-able’ added straight on to words ending in –ce or –ge.  ’-ible’ added onto root words with some ending removed. 

  • adorable
  • adorably
  • adoration
  • applicable
  • applicably
  • application
  • considerable
  • considerably
  • consideration

 High frequency

  • soon
  • night

Week 4

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-able/-ably’ is used if there is a related word ending in ‘–ation’.  ‘-able’ added straight on to words ending in –ce or –ge.  ’-ible’ added onto root words with some ending removed. 

  • tolerable
  • tolerably
  • toleration
  • changeable
  • noticeable
  • forcible
  • legible
  • probable
  • probably

 High frequency

  • narrator
  • small

Week 5

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-ible/-ibly’ is used if the root word is not heard completely before the ending.  ‘able’/’ably’ is used if the complete word is heard before. 

  • possible
  • possibly
  • horrible
  • horribly
  • terrible
  • terribly
  • visible
  • visibly
  • incredible
  • incredibly
  • sensible
  • sensibly

 High frequency

  • couldn’t
  • three

Week 6

To revise commonly misspelt wordsTo revise  Maths terminology

Maths words Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher 

  • numerator
  • denominator
  • fraction
  • percentage
  • column
  • quadrilateral
  • horizontal
  • vertical
  • diagonal

 High frequency

  • head
  • king

Week 7

Class revision

 Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • town
  • I’ve

Week 1

To identify words ending in “ious”

If the root word ends in ’ceor a soft sound, it is usually  ‘–cious’.  If a hard sound, usually ‘-tion’ 

  • vicious
  • precious
  • conscious
  • delicious
  • malicious
  • suspicious
  • ambitious
  • cautious
  • fictitious
  • infectious
  • nutritious
  • anxious (exception)

 High frequency

  • around
  • every

Week 2

To compare words ending in “cial” and “tial”

‘-cialis common after a vowel letter and ‘tialafter a consonant letter 

  • official
  • special
  • partial
  • confidential
  • essential
  • torrential
  • artificial
  • prejudicial
  • beneficial
  • palatial
  • glacial
  • initial (exception)

 High frequency

  • garden
  • laughed

Week 3

To identify when we use ‘ent’, ‘ence’ or ‘ency’

‘-ent’, ‘-ence’ and ‘–encyafter a soft ‘c’ or soft ‘g’ or ‘qu’ 

  • innocent
  • innocence
  • decent
  • decency
  • frequent
  • frequency
  • confident
  • confidence
  • violent
  • violence

 High frequency

  • let’s
  • suddenly

Week 4

To explain when words can end in ‘ation’

Look for related words with an ‘a’ sound or those that can end in ‘–ation’ for ance, –ancy and -ant words. 

  • observant
  • observance
  • expectant
  • hesitant
  • hesitancy
  • tolerant
  • tolerance
  • substance
  • observation
  • expectation

 High frequency

  • another
  • great

Week 5

To explain when we add suffixes

The ‘r’ is doubled if the  ‘fer ‘is still stressed when the ending is added.  If it is no longer stressed, it stays as a single ‘r’. 

  • referring
  • referred
  • referral
  • preferring
  • preferred
  • transferring
  • transferred
  • reference
  • referee
  • preference
  • transference

 High frequency

  • cried
  • jumped

Week 6

To discuss the use of  hyphens

Hyphens are used to join words together.  They are especially used to join prefixes that end in a vowel to root words that begin with a vowel. 

  • co-ordinate
  • re-enter
  • co-operate
  • co-own
  • anti-inflammatory
  • de-emphasise
  • co-inhabit
  • co-education

 Exceptions

  • ex-wife
  • self-evident
  • all-inclusive
  • cross-reference
  • co-star
  • anti-clockwise

 High frequency

  • because
  • before

Week 1

To identify spellings with double letters

Look for the words that have two or three sets of doubles 

  • accommodate
  • accompany
  • according
  • aggressive
  • apparent
  • appreciate
  • attached
  • committee
  • communicate
  • abbreviate

 High frequency

  • clothes
  • place

Week 2

To identify spellings with double letters

Look for the words that have two or three sets of doubles 

  • community
  • correspond
  • exaggerate
  • excellent
  • necessary
  • programme
  • sufficient
  • embarrass
  • harass
  • vacuum

 High frequency

  • mother
  • window

Week 3

To recognise silent letters

Look at the history of these words – what languages have they evolved from? 

  • amateur
  • bruise,
  • language
  • muscle
  • nuisance
  • parliament
  • queue
  • rhyme

 High frequency

  • morning
  • queen

Week 4

To recognise silent letters

Look at the history of these words – what languages have they evolved from? 

  • rhythm
  • shoulder
  • soldier
  • stomach
  • yacht
  • leisure
  • guarantee
  • restaurant

 High frequency

  • green
  • different

Week 5

To compare when words have ‘ei’ and ‘ie’

‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’ – although there are some exceptions 

  • deceive
  • conceive
  • perceive
  • ceiling
  • receive
  • exceptions
  • caffeine
  • protein
  • seize
  • either
  • neither

 High frequency

  • which
  • friends

Week 6

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher. High frequency

  • there’s
  • looking

Week 1

To compare a variety of suffixes

Suffixes change the part of speech of a word – can the children discuss the change in form and spot the root word?NB  Some root words are altered slightly for the spelling 

  • determined
  • criticise
  • curiosity
  • definite
  • equipment
  • equipped
  • explanation
  • existence
  • government
  • marvellous
  • lightning

 High frequency

  • better
  • across

Week 2

To compare a variety of suffixes

Suffixes change the part of speech of a word – can the children discuss the change in form and spot the root word?NB  Some root words are altered slightly for the spelling 

  • opportunity
  • sufficient
  • sincerely
  • signature
  • sacrifice
  • pronunciation
  • hindrance
  • immediately
  • dictionary
  • competition
  • frequently

 High frequency

  • floppy
  • really

Week 3

To discuss suffixes that sound like ‘shun

Generally the suffixes are ‘-ion’ and ‘-ian’. The letters that come before this are either ‘t’ (the most common), ‘s’, ‘ss’ or ‘c’.If the root word ends in ‘t’ or ‘te’, it is usually ‘ion’.If the root word ends in ‘c’ or ‘c’, it is usually ‘cian’.If the root word ends in ‘ss’ or ‘mit’, it is usually ‘ssion’.If the root word ends in ‘d’ or ‘se’, it is usually ‘sion’. 

  • expression
  • musician
  • celebration
  • consideration
  • collision
  • possession
  • politician
  • magician
  • imagination
  • inspiration
  • division

 High frequency

  • please
  • thing

Week 4

To identify a range of prefixes

 

  • recommend
  • revisit
  • disapprove
  • disgrace
  • misunderstand
  • incomprehensible
  • imperfection(NB  suffix ending too)
  • interconnected
  • unimaginable
  • undiscovered

 High frequency

  • stopped
  • lived

Week 5

To compare  the history of words

Where did these words originate?  What can you find out about them? E.g. conscience and conscious are related to science – from Latin word ‘scio’ meaning ‘I know’ 

  • perilous
  • conscious
  • desperate
  • familiar
  • mischievous
  • antique
  • province
  • circumstance

 High frequency

  • rabbit
  • white

Week 6

To recognise spelling words containing ‘ie’ and ‘ei’

Think about how some of these words go against the ‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’ rule – why?  Look to the sounds or origin of words. 

  • achieve
  • ancient
  • convenience
  • foreign
  • neighbour
  • variety
  • Conscience

 High frequency

  • suddenly
  • choices

Week 1

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • prejudice
  • recognise
  • awkward
  • category
  • disastrous
  • identity
  • persuade
  • privilege
  • temperature
  • twelfth
  • vegetable
  • vehicle

 High frequency

  • coming
  • he’s

Week 2

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • available
  • average
  • bargain
  • cemetery
  • controversy
  • develop
  • environment
  • especially
  • forty
  • individual
  • interfere
  • interrupt

 High frequency

  • river
  • liked

Week 3

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • occupy
  • occur
  • profession
  • relevant
  • secretary
  • signature
  • suggest
  • thorough
  • variety

 High frequency

  • giant
  • looks

Week 4

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • along
  • plants

Week 5

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • dragon
  • pulled

Week 6

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • we’re
  • stepped

Week 1

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • aisle
  • Isle
  • affect
  • effect
  • aloud
  • allowed
  • altar
  • alter
  • ascent
  • assent
  • bridal
  • bridle

 High frequency

  • through
  • been

Week 2

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • council
  • counsel
  • gorilla
  • guerrilla
  • guessed
  • guest
  • morning
  • mourning
  • past
  • passed
  • precede
  • proceed

 High frequency

  • stop
  • must

Week 3

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • course
  • coarse
  • foreword
  • forward
  • threw
  • through
  • compliment
  • complement
  • desert
  • dessert
  • board
  • bored

 High frequency

  • door
  • right

Week 4

To explain homophones

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word, but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling 

  • principal
  • principle
  • profit
  • prophet
  • stationary
  • stationery
  • who’s
  •  whose
  • draft
  • draught

 High frequency

  • these
  • began

Week 5

To discuss grammatical terminology

These terms are needed for the KS2 Sats exam. 

  • subordinate
  • preposition
  • adverbial
  • abstract
  • synonym
  • antonym
  • determiner
  • progressive
  • conjunction
  • sentence

 High frequency

  • animals
  • never

Week 6

To analyse different sounds of ‘ough’

‘ough’ has over ten different pronunciations in UK English 

  • enough
  • though
  • although
  • sourdough
  • through
  • thorough
  • borough
  • plough
  • furlough

 High frequency

  • first
  • work

Week 7

To identify silent letters

Look out for the silent letters together – investigate the history of the words to see why they are there 

  • artistically
  • acquire
  • government
  • thistle
  • knight
  • comb
  • succumb
  • yacht
  • pneumonia
  • mortgage

 High frequency

  • that’s
  • mouse

Week 1

To identify silent letters

Look out for the silent letters together – investigate the history of the words to see why they are there 

  • receipt
  • asthma
  • plague
  • sword
  • drought
  • rhyme
  • knot
  • subtle
  • parliament

 High frequency

  • something
  • still

Week 2

To recognise  spellings that change nouns to verbs

The nouns end in ce  and verbs end in -se 

  • device
  • devise
  • evaporate
  • evaporation
  • licence
  • license
  • practise
  • practice
  • prophecy
  • prophesy

 High frequency

  • found
  • live

Week 3

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-able/-ably’ is used if there is a related word ending in ‘–ation’.  ‘-able’ added straight on to words ending in –ce or –ge.  ’-ible’ added onto root words with some ending removed. 

  • adorable
  • adorably
  • adoration
  • applicable
  • applicably
  • application
  • considerable
  • considerably
  • consideration

 High frequency

  • soon
  • night

Week 4

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-able/-ably’ is used if there is a related word ending in ‘–ation’.  ‘-able’ added straight on to words ending in –ce or –ge.  ’-ible’ added onto root words with some ending removed. 

  • tolerable
  • tolerably
  • toleration
  • changeable
  • noticeable
  • forcible
  • legible

 High frequency

  • narrator
  • small

Week 5

To compare endings that sound the same but are spelt differently

‘-ible/-ibly’ is used if the root word is not heard completely before the ending.  ‘able’/’ably’ is used if the complete word is heard before. 

  • possible
  • possibly
  • horrible
  • horribly
  • terrible
  • terribly
  • visible
  • visibly
  • incredible
  • incredibly
  • sensible
  • sensibly

 High frequency

  • couldn’t
  • three

Week 6

To revise commonly misspelt wordsTo revise  Maths terminology

Maths words Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher 

  • equivalent
  • parallel
  • perpendicular
  • symmetry
  • translation
  • circumference
  • intersecting
  • rhombus

 High frequency

  • head
  • king

Week 7

To revise commonly misspelt wordsTo revise  Maths terminology

 Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • town
  • I’ve

Week 1

To identify words ending in “ious”

If the root word ends in ’ceor a soft sound, it is usually  ‘–cious’.  If a hard sound, usually ‘-tion’ 

  • ferocious
  • precious
  • conscious
  • nutritious
  • malicious
  • suspicious
  • ambitious
  • cautious
  • fictitious
  • infectious
  • superstitious
  • anxious (exception)

 High frequency

  • around
  • every

Week 2

To compare words ending in “cial” and “tial”

‘-cialis common after a vowel letter and ‘tialafter a consonant letter 

  • beneficial
  • influential
  • partial
  • confidential
  • essential
  • torrential
  • provincial
  • consequential
  • financial
  • initial
  • commercial

 High frequency

  • garden
  • laughed

Week 3

To identify when we use ‘ent’, ‘ence’ or ‘ency’

‘-ent’, ‘-ence’ and ‘–encyafter a soft ‘c’ or soft ‘g’ or ‘qu’ 

  • innocent
  • innocence
  • decent
  • decency
  • frequent
  • frequency
  • independent
  • independence
  • obedient
  • obedience

 High frequency

  • let’s
  • suddenly

Week 4

To explain when words can end in ‘ation’

Look for related words with an ‘a’ sound or those that can end in ‘–ation’ for ance, –ancy and -ant words. 

  • observant
  • observance
  • expectant
  • hesitant
  • hesitancy
  • tolerant
  • tolerance
  • Substance
  • hesitation
  • toleration

 High frequency

  • another
  • great

Week 5

To explain when we add suffixes

The ‘r’ is doubled if the  ‘fer ‘is still stressed when the ending is added.  If it is no longer stressed, it stays as a single ‘r’. 

  • referring
  • referred
  • referral
  • preferring
  • preferred
  • transferring
  • transferred
  • reference
  • referee
  • preference
  • transference

 High frequency

  • cried
  • jumped

Week 6

To discuss words which contain ‘ei’ and ‘ie’

‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’ – although there are some exceptions 

  • efficient
  • proficient
  • pierce
  • receipt
  • deceit
  • conceit
  • experience
  • achieve
  • thief
  • yield

 High frequency

  • because
  • before

Week 1

To identify spellings with double letters

Look for the words that have two or three sets of doubles 

  • brilliant
  • annoyed
  • apparatus
  • collection
  • possessive
  • channel
  • skiing
  • beginning
  • aardvark

 High frequency

  • clothes
  • place

Week 2

To identify spellings with double letters

Look for the words that have two or three sets of doubles 

  • community
  • correspond
  • exaggerate
  • excellent
  • necessary
  • programme
  • sufficient
  • embarrass
  • harass
  • vacuum

 High frequency

  • mother
  • window

Week 3

To recognise silent letters

Look at the history of these words – what languages have they evolved from? 

  • stalk
  • rhythm
  • succumb
  • rhino
  • salmon
  • knick
  • gnome
  • write
  • physical

 High frequency

  • morning
  • queen

Week 4

To recognise silent letters

Look at the history of these words – what languages have they evolved from? 

  • aplomb
  • wrinkles
  • Suffolk
  • wreck
  • abscess
  • plumber
  • wrist
  • knuckle
  • yolk
  • crumb

 High frequency

  • green
  • different

Week 5

To discuss the use of  hyphens

Hyphens are used to join words together.  They are especially used to join prefixes that end in a vowel to root words that begin with a vowel. 

  • co-ordinate
  • re-enter
  • co-operate
  • co-own
  • anti-inflammatory
  • de-emphasise
  • co-inhabit
  • co-education

 Exceptions

  • ex-wife
  • self-evident
  • all-inclusive
  • cross-reference
  • co-star
  • anti-clockwise

 High frequency

  • which
  • friends

Week 6

Class revision session

Appropriate spelling list as devised by the teacher High frequency

  • there’s
  • looking

Week 1

To compare a variety of suffixes

Suffixes change the part of speech of a word – can the children discuss the change in form and spot the root word?NB  Some root words are altered slightly for the spelling 

  • determined
  • criticise
  • curiosity
  • definite
  • equipment
  • equipped
  • explanation
  • existence
  • government
  • marvellous
  • lightning

 High frequency

  • better
  • across

Week 2

To compare a variety of suffixes

Suffixes change the part of speech of a word – can the children discuss the change in form and spot the root word?NB  Some root words are altered slightly for the spelling 

  • opportunity
  • sufficient
  • sincerely
  • signature
  • sacrifice
  • pronunciation
  • hindrance
  • immediately
  • dictionary
  • competition
  • frequently

 High frequency

  • floppy
  • really

Week 3

To discuss suffixes that sound like ‘shun

Generally the suffixes are ‘-ion’ and ‘-ian’. The letters that come before this are either ‘t’ (the most common), ‘s’, ‘ss’ or ‘c’.If the root word ends in ‘t’ or ‘te’, it is usually ‘ion’.If the root word ends in ‘c’ or ‘c’, it is usually ‘cian’.If the root word ends in ‘ss’ or ‘mit’, it is usually ‘ssion’.If the root word ends in ‘d’ or ‘se’, it is usually ‘sion’. 

  • expression
  • musician
  • celebration
  • consideration
  • collision
  • possession
  • politician
  • magician
  • imagination
  • inspiration
  • division

 High frequency

  • please
  • thing

Week 4

Sats revision

Week 5

Sats week

Week 6

To identify a range of prefixes

 

  • recommend
  • revisit
  • disapprove
  • disgrace
  • misunderstand
  • incomprehensible
  • imperfection(NB  suffix ending too)
  • interconnected
  • unimaginable
  • undiscovered

 High frequency

  • stopped
  • lived

Week 1

To explain when spelling words containing ‘ie’ and ‘ei’

Think about how some of these words go against the ‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’ rule – why?  Look to the sounds or origin of words. 

  • achieve
  • ancient
  • convenience
  • foreign
  • neighbour
  • variety
  • conscience

 High frequency

  • rabbit
  • white

Week 2

To explain when spelling words containing ‘ie’ and ‘ei’

Think about how some of these words go against the ‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’ rule – why?  Look to the sounds or origin of words. 

  • conceive
  • cashier
  • transceiver
  • perceive
  • concierge
  • forfeit
  • science

 High frequency

  • suddenly
  • choices

Week 3

Rhos y Gwaliau

Week 4

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • prejudice
  • recognise
  • awkward
  • category
  • disastrous
  • identity
  • persuade
  • privilege
  • temperature
  • twelfth
  • vegetable
  • vehicle

 High frequency

  • coming
  • he’s

Week 5

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings? 

  • available
  • average
  • bargain
  • cemetery
  • controversy
  • develop
  • environment
  • especially
  • forty
  • individual
  • interfere
  • interrupt

 High frequency

  • river
  • liked

Week 6

To compare the history of a range of spelling words

Children look at the words from this week’s spellings and choose a couple to investigate – can they find the history of the words, similar words, similar meanings, similar spellings?

 

  • occupy
  • occur
  • profession
  • relevant
  • secretary
  • signature
  • suggest
  • thorough
  • variety

 

High frequency

  • giant
  • looks